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#1 Oct 04, 2017 4:49 pm

New Historian
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Reflections on the Grenada Revo

When you look back on all that happened, you just can't put it all together.  You had all the ingredients of a major cold war drama: Cuban soldiers, Russian spies, the CIA, and ultimately the biggest military invasion since the Second World War - all on a tiny Caribbean island which nobody had ever heard of.  When you hear the stories, talk to the survivors, when you see where it all happened, you search for some rationalization for the horror that took place.  But you can't find any.  How could such barbarism erupt in an island like Grenada, a place so many people would describe as idyllic?

What makes it all the more unfathomable is that in small-town Grenada, everyone knows everyone.  Just stand on any street corner and watch.  People are constantly honking horns and hailing each other.  To the soldier in the firing squad, the man lined up against the wall is not just another prisoner, he's Tantie Merle's boy from Grenville, the one he used to play football with in high school.  Yet he still pulls the trigger.  In the name of what?

And the funny thing was: as quickly as it came, it went.  When you look at Grenada now you can't believe this is the same country, that these are the same people.  So-and-so the electrician, he was a major in the army.  And so-and-so the businessman, he was a minister of government.  But where did it all go?  Where have all the revolutionaries gone?  Where is the residual threat?  You can't see it.  It’s as though Grenadians have closed the door on that whole episode and don't want it reopened.  It’s not a subject people talk readily about, but everyone has their story.  It’s the best kept secret in town.

What about all the guns?  At the height of the Revo Grenada was the most militarized country in the world, on a per capita basis.  Yet after the invasion only a fraction of the guns were ever accounted for.  What happened to the rest?  Some people say they've been sold to the Trinidadians.  Some say they’re still buried in the hills.  No one knows for sure.

But that's all in the past.  Grenada is starting to show signs of growth and is catching up with its Caribbean neighbours.  Tourists are back, things are upbeat.  If nothing else the events of 1983 taught Grenadians to cherish their freedom and not to follow false gods.  So that sort of thing couldn't happen again.

Could it?


Forward_Ever_Backword_Never.jpg

Last edited by New Historian (Oct 04, 2017 4:50 pm)

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#2 Oct 04, 2017 4:54 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

The American military hauled tons of guns off the island.  I saw them palletized for shipping.  I don't know where they ended up - maybe with the Contras in Nicaragua - but they were taken off island.

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#3 Oct 04, 2017 4:59 pm

New Historian
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

Real Distwalker wrote:

The American military hauled tons of guns off the island.  I saw them palletized for shipping.  I don't know where they ended up - maybe with the Contras in Nicaragua - but they were taken off island.

Good!

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#4 Oct 05, 2017 6:29 am

Dancer
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

New Historian wrote:

When you look back on all that happened, you just can't put it all together.  You had all the ingredients of a major cold war drama: Cuban soldiers, Russian spies, the CIA, and ultimately the biggest military invasion since the Second World War - all on a tiny Caribbean island which nobody had ever heard of.  When you hear the stories, talk to the survivors, when you see where it all happened, you search for some rationalization for the horror that took place.  But you can't find any.  How could such barbarism erupt in an island like Grenada, a place so many people would describe as idyllic?

What makes it all the more unfathomable is that in small-town Grenada, everyone knows everyone.  Just stand on any street corner and watch.  People are constantly honking horns and hailing each other.  To the soldier in the firing squad, the man lined up against the wall is not just another prisoner, he's Tantie Merle's boy from Grenville, the one he used to play football with in high school.  Yet he still pulls the trigger.  In the name of what?

And the funny thing was: as quickly as it came, it went.  When you look at Grenada now you can't believe this is the same country, that these are the same people.  So-and-so the electrician, he was a major in the army.  And so-and-so the businessman, he was a minister of government.  But where did it all go?  Where have all the revolutionaries gone?  Where is the residual threat?  You can't see it.  It’s as though Grenadians have closed the door on that whole episode and don't want it reopened.  It’s not a subject people talk readily about, but everyone has their story.  It’s the best kept secret in town.

What about all the guns?  At the height of the Revo Grenada was the most militarized country in the world, on a per capita basis.  Yet after the invasion only a fraction of the guns were ever accounted for.  What happened to the rest?  Some people say they've been sold to the Trinidadians.  Some say they’re still buried in the hills.  No one knows for sure.

But that's all in the past.  Grenada is starting to show signs of growth and is catching up with its Caribbean neighbours.  Tourists are back, things are upbeat.  If nothing else the events of 1983 taught Grenadians to cherish their freedom and not to follow false gods.  So that sort of thing couldn't happen again.

Could it?


https://s1.postimg.org/61o9f8s58r/Forward_Ever_Backword_Never.jpg


The Gree Revo seemed to be settling down . Then the massacre . Pissed the Caribbean  right off .
Those guys watched too many 10 cents Sat morning  - Al Capone - gangster movies.
Sad.

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#5 Oct 05, 2017 8:04 am

Slice
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

Well what sort of thing? If you are talking about the revolution, it was a must and had to happen. 

My other point is one thing about you NH, you are always thought provoking.

Years after the revo, I still can not understand the brutality of what happened.  Most leaders of the NJM preached none violence, and that is why the brutality of what happened that end the revo is mind blowing.

There were three folks that were involved heavily in the revo, that were very brutal.  Strachan Phillip, the first Commander of the army, and THAT BASTARD Bernard Coard.  Coard did not have ah soul.  Is like he had Ice in his veins. The first Commander of the army, I can't remember his name, and maybe HA.  I am not sure about HA.

What is surprising about the brutality, was I know most of the guys that committed these horrible deeds.  The main culprit Abdullah, this guy was me real PADNAH.  At one time just before the revo, me and him was ah a hut in the Red Mud, drinking and having our way with two Women.  His acts of brutality shock the SHEET OUTA ME.

Yes is like Grenadians really wants to forget.  That is not easily done.  Even out present PM and that Greedy ASSHOLE who should of been our present PM Peter David talks  like Maurice and really wants to be Maurice.

I am not sure if Maurice, Bro Dix, Whiteman and them, knew what they were getting into when Coard became part of them.

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#6 Oct 05, 2017 8:34 am

Slice
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

Real Distwalker wrote:

The American military hauled tons of guns off the island.  I saw them palletized for shipping.  I don't know where they ended up - maybe with the Contras in Nicaragua - but they were taken off island.

Well ah bunch of them are still on the island. One of me PADNAHs still have about five AKs. He promise he go give me two, when ah return, but ah want ah dog instead, not ah gun.

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#7 Oct 05, 2017 8:57 am

Real Distwalker
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Re: Reflections on the Grenada Revo

There were so many I am not surprised that some were squirreled away.

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