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#11 Oct 30, 2017 3:53 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

I read the free sample of the book. In the free sample there is a lively discussion regarding the means to defend Grenada militarily and the disagreements the Grenadians and Cubans experienced regarding that question.

Coard argues that Bishop was a little too chummy with the Cubans. This, he implies, is the seed of their falling out.

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#12 Oct 30, 2017 6:09 pm

Expat
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

Calypso wrote:

I am not denying your arguments because I have seen it too. Caribbean parents in America have that attitude also. They really do not do a lot with their children. They expect you do  it for them. They do not realize that education begins at home and not with the school system.  The Caribbean is primarily a working-class region and many of the mothers are uneducated. They usually do not have a man around for two helping out is better than one person working alone. They can be poorly spoken as I have witnessed in the Grenadian, Jamaican and most Guyanese nannies who work with the children I teach.  Thy do have children much earlier than white American women. But England has had a different history. You did have a lot of smart children coming from the island that were misplaced by the English. Many assumed that because they were from the islands they were plain dumb and that was not the fact. Many were brighter than they thought. As a teacher, I distinguished from both. The brightest I've worked with are the ones from Barbados. I have worked with some smart Jamaicans but their parents were professionals in the island. Haitians are in a world of their own. They can be very driven and many people do not know this.  Class matters. Mr. Coard's book should have been taken more seriously but it was not. It offered a solution to our problem.  As for young black males being hard-headed? I am not denying this. They are rough and tough! I have noticed that they love working with their hands, picking up garbage, carpentry, mason work. For some reason they don't like to study. But I have asked myself, why are they not like the black males I grew up with in the Caribbean. They were far more driven.  They also had black men as models who could talk to them and did not fear them. Coard offered that as a possible solution: more black teachers, more black men! I have worked with lots of Caribbean parents and I do not like the attitude. I can tell what their background was like in their homelands and it wasn't much. The children of the teachers are exceptional for they are trained for the Ivy Leagues from a very early age and they do go one to do good things.


https://www.theguardian.com/education/2 … einschools


As I did state from the outset apra po your remark about smart Caribbean kids coming to the UK and being misplaced was not that they didn't speak and understand English, but that they spoke and understood Caribbean English, which is NOT the same thing.

I have sat and listened to inter school quizzes here in Grenada,,,, a take off of the 'English' University Challenge, and I have to say I struggled with MANY of the questions... sometimes because surprisingly enough I don't know it all.... but often times the questions were structured differently to what I would have expected.... yet the students who are used to the Grenadian framing of questions leaped too and many times gave correct answers,,, they were not dumb at all, but if they were asked the same questions the English way they might have been scratching their head the same way I was hearing them spoken the Grenadian way.

The English language can be a very subtle thing. As illustrated by me having a simple conversation with my then English CEO.... after many years of various American CEO's.... I was just a few words into a sentence, and Mr Man says Expat, I know exactly what you mean I am not American (There was a linguistic bond between us), whereas had I been saying the same thing to one of the Americans I would have had to spell it out.... it is just a different use and familiarity with the Language as used in the Home Counties of England.

To be fair, there would be a disconnect even with English people from the Northern Counties like Yorkshire for example, so if communication might not be so fluid with  English separated by 200 miles, how much greater the disconnect when it is a completely different society 4500 miles away.

Moving forward in time from the times of the Windrush to more recent times. The YOUTH.... initially Black, but now Black, White, Asian, all and sundry, they have a distinct patois, which is enhibiting them from using the language correctly.

I remember as a child all those years ago, speaking like my more cockney chums from school and in the street where I lived, but I sure as hell spoke correctly when I was at home. These kids will just talk their patois where ever they are. Not making them a strong candidate for a high flying job unless you are in a specialist field, or an Entrepreneur.

My Trini partners girls both got degrees, they would have been born late 60's, and went to inner London Schools.... admittedly Catholic not State. I would like to think my presence in their lives was beneficial. Both were quite dark in complexion. But it doesn't seem to have got in their way.

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#13 Oct 30, 2017 6:34 pm

Calypso
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

Real Distwalker wrote:

I read the free sample of the book. In the free sample there is a lively discussion regarding the means to defend Grenada militarily and the disagreements the Grenadians and Cubans experienced regarding that question.

Coard argues that Bishop was a little too chummy with the Cubans. This, he implies, is the seed of their falling out.


I think it was a power struggle between him and the Prime Minister. He wanted to take control of the country. He talked about the boyhood bond between him and Bishop. I asked myself, how could it have ended so bitterly?

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#14 Oct 30, 2017 9:51 pm

Expat
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

Calypso wrote:
Real Distwalker wrote:

I read the free sample of the book. In the free sample there is a lively discussion regarding the means to defend Grenada militarily and the disagreements the Grenadians and Cubans experienced regarding that question.

Coard argues that Bishop was a little too chummy with the Cubans. This, he implies, is the seed of their falling out.


I think it was a power struggle between him and the Prime Minister. He wanted to take control of the country. He talked about the boyhood bond between him and Bishop. I asked myself, how could it have ended so bitterly?

Power or the prospect of power corrupts, the prospect of absolute power corrupts absolutely. Probably that Greenz eyed monster that seems to be so prevalent when someone gets on in Grenada.

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#15 Oct 31, 2017 3:57 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

I was just told that Marines of H Battery 3/10th Marines captured him and they had to defend him from a group of Grenadians armed with shovels and 2x4 boards who wanted to kill him.  This was near Queens Park.  When he was being guarded, Coard cussed the Marines calling them "fucking American running dogs" and such.

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#16 Oct 31, 2017 4:24 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Bernard Coard's First Book is Very Important but Ignored

Hudson Austin, unlike the Coards, kept his mouth shut and didn't say a word or even make eye contact with the Marines.  He just looked at the ground.

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