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#11 Nov 11, 2017 11:53 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


Chiswick.jpg

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#12 Nov 12, 2017 7:09 am

Calypso
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

New Historian wrote:

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


https://s7.postimg.org/83qwykmx3/Chiswick.jpg


From a bird's eye view the community doesn't seem wealthy. Tell me in England,  do the different races live in integrated communities? When I was in Austria, they do. The Austrians are very racist but they hadn't segregated the living conditions of the races and that is good. When peoples of different races live apart, it reinforces racial stereotypes. We do not know a lot about each other.  America is very segregated. Whites live here and blacks live there. The black and Latino neighborhoods are the worst because they are poorer than whites.

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#13 Nov 12, 2017 7:29 am

Expat
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

New Historian wrote:

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


https://s7.postimg.org/83qwykmx3/Chiswick.jpg

Chiswick was a magnet for the arty crafty actors and the like especially Chiswick Village down by the river, and adjacent was an area called Bedford park... there was no park by that name, although it was next to Turnham Green. That part had long windy roads with 4 and 5 bedroom type mansions. Where I lived however was at THAT time working class conjoined housing some of which was terraced. Now probably the lowest mortal living there would be a Doctor.

The house we lived in could have been bought back in the 50's for £800. Now it is over £1000,000.

My doctor was in Wellesley Road at the bottom of your map. However "Chiswick Town" would be considered further to the right

Last edited by Expat (Nov 12, 2017 7:33 am)

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#14 Nov 12, 2017 10:12 am

Calypso
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

Expat wrote:
New Historian wrote:

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


https://s7.postimg.org/83qwykmx3/Chiswick.jpg

Chiswick was a magnet for the arty crafty actors and the like especially Chiswick Village down by the river, and adjacent was an area called Bedford park... there was no park by that name, although it was next to Turnham Green. That part had long windy roads with 4 and 5 bedroom type mansions. Where I lived however was at THAT time working class conjoined housing some of which was terraced. Now probably the lowest mortal living there would be a Doctor.

The house we lived in could have been bought back in the 50's for £800. Now it is over £1000,000.

My doctor was in Wellesley Road at the bottom of your map. However "Chiswick Town" would be considered further to the right


a million pounds is more than a million dollars but in America, particularly  in New York and California it can't buy you anything too spiffy.

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#15 Nov 12, 2017 10:27 am

New Historian
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

Calypso wrote:
New Historian wrote:

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


https://s7.postimg.org/83qwykmx3/Chiswick.jpg


From a bird's eye view the community doesn't seem wealthy. Tell me in England,  do the different races live in integrated communities? When I was in Austria, they do. The Austrians are very racist but they hadn't segregated the living conditions of the races and that is good. When peoples of different races live apart, it reinforces racial stereotypes. We do not know a lot about each other.  America is very segregated. Whites live here and blacks live there. The black and Latino neighborhoods are the worst because they are poorer than whites.


I wouldn't say they are segregated as such, but you do have some communities that are more "ethnic" than others. In some places, like Balham, it's barely possible to find a shop that speaks English lol.

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#16 Nov 12, 2017 12:52 pm

piratejenny
Member

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

For serious thiefing of produce, recall the Praedial Larcency Law of the Bishop years.

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#17 Nov 12, 2017 12:56 pm

Calypso
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

New Historian wrote:
Calypso wrote:
New Historian wrote:

I remember Chiswick as being somewhat up the social/economic ladder than my oh-so boring Kenton, Harrow, Middlesex - with similar urban physical geography, no?


https://s7.postimg.org/83qwykmx3/Chiswick.jpg


From a bird's eye view the community doesn't seem wealthy. Tell me in England,  do the different races live in integrated communities? When I was in Austria, they do. The Austrians are very racist but they hadn't segregated the living conditions of the races and that is good. When peoples of different races live apart, it reinforces racial stereotypes. We do not know a lot about each other.  America is very segregated. Whites live here and blacks live there. The black and Latino neighborhoods are the worst because they are poorer than whites.


I wouldn't say they are segregated as such, but you do have some communities that are more "ethnic" than others. In some places, like Balham, it's barely possible to find a shop that speaks English lol.

In America, you have Caribbean neighborhoods like Canarsie and Flatbush, Crown Heights-- and some parts of Queens which are heavily Caribbean residence. Its as if we didn't migrate and I hate that. I chose to live in a multicultural neighborhood. I am in America now and I would like to integrate to know about peoples from different lands!

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#18 Nov 12, 2017 3:31 pm

houston
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

Calypso wrote:
houston wrote:

Oh the joys of being a neighborhood brat. No pear or peach tree would be overlooked. Carrots would be uprooted and eaten with the grime and grit. No, it wasn't the rabbits.
During the summer months each kid had a tent set up in the backyard for sleep outs. We would meet up with our bycicles at 2am and raid gardens. Tomatoes were a favourite. We would load up with the juicy one's and do a drive by through from the street into the can't miss garage doors of the fine folks who were asleep. What a bang that was, and a true waste of good food.
During the winter, a favourite activity was to bumper jump. When the roads were snowy and a car stopped at an intersection, we would kneel down and grab hold of the bumper for a ride. Sometimes there would be to much weight and the wheels would only spin and spit up snow. The driver would get out to inspect those new snow tires. All he would see is a bunch of Gremlins scattering into the bushes.

Yup, we were all brats at one time or another.


Holding the car's bumper for a ride is dangerous but a teenager would know that, would he? We had no common sense. Everything was done for the thrill!

Zero common sense. Some the activities during youth were very high risk and downright stupid. We had to be creative, with no video games and all the other electronic gadgets. We were invincible, we had some great fun and somehow managed to survive it.

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#19 Nov 12, 2017 7:47 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

Some of my enduring childhood memories are the smells of Auntie Laurina's rumshop on a Friday night: white rum, saltfish, flour, pigtail souse, and sweat. Us boys would wedge ourselves into a corner and try to remain unseen, while listening the ebb and flow of “ole talk” floated around us. Because to be noticed by Auntie Laurina would mean being banished with a switch across your backside for sneaking around big people business.

But a lash from feeble Auntie Laurina was nothing compared to the real terror that followed: the walk home. This was before street lighting came to Saint Davids, and on a moonless night it would be pitch black. You had to stumble down the road, feeling your way in the blackness. Our heads would be filled with tales of local demons such as Loup Garoux (or ligaroo, a werewolf), La Diablesse (a beautiful lady whose long dress hides a cloven hoof), and Sucuyant (an old lady who peels off her skin and turns into a ball of fire). As we went stumbling down the path from the shop to the house, my big brothers would give me some new piece of terrifying information about these demons – then make a run for it, leaving me bawling in the dark.

“Wait for meeee!!”

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#20 Nov 12, 2017 9:15 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: The gentle art of scrumping

Great memories, NH. 

I don't have anything that exciting but I remember walking at night on country roads with no lights as well. Sometimes you would feel a cold whiff of air.  That was me passing through a ghost in the night, I was told, and it scared me to death.

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