You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the the original, the one and only, Spiceislander Talkshop. The site remains Grenadian owned and hosted in the United States.

#1 Jan 06, 2017 11:06 pm

Expat
Active

Sand mining at Galby

I have been watching the systematic mining of this beach, If you look at the photo you will see how close they already are to someone's boundary marker. They dig out the banks, I have even seen where they have been digging straight off the high tide mark of the beach. Anyone buying this sand will have a property that will have real problems with the concrete, and they will probably have no idea the sand was stolen.





Photo0168.jpg

Offline

#2 Jan 07, 2017 1:28 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Disgusting and so short sighted. Most of the time when people talk about "rising lea levels" what's really happening is subsidence due to uncontrolled mining. If the sea level's rising so much then why isn't the Carenage under water?

Offline

#3 Jan 08, 2017 7:21 am

gripe
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Stick to the issue and don't become unhinged with your arguments. You make a valid comment about the effects of the sand mining that Expat noted. However, your comment about the Carenage and the effects of sea level rise is misplaced. The Carenage may not be exhibiting drawbacks from sea level rise but that is no proof that sea level rise is not a major problem elsewhere.

Offline

#4 Jan 08, 2017 9:27 am

New Historian
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

"The Carenage may not be exhibiting drawbacks from sea level rise but that is no proof that sea level rise is not a major problem elsewhere."

Tell me about unhinged! So, according to your argument the sea level isn't rising in the Carenage, but it is rising elsewhere? Please explain how that works, for as far as I can remember from high school physics, water levels always are the same, it's called gravity.

Offline

#5 Jan 08, 2017 6:22 pm

gripe
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Don't limit yourself. I interpreted your attack on the idea about sea level rise to be a very general criticism of what, in effect, is the argument that climate change exists and that sea level increases are indicative of climate change. With that background, not necessarily agreeing with you that there isn't sea level changes taking place on the Carenage, you just need to broaden your horizon and you will find undisputed evidence of sea level increases in many areas of the world. Please don't be narrow minded.

Offline

#6 Jan 08, 2017 10:42 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

But ... but ... but... didn't you ever do physics in high school? Don't you know that one immutable rule is that: water ALWAYS finds its own level: if it's not rising in the Carenage, it CAN'T be rising in, say, Telescope, where people say that it is. What's happening in Telescope and many other beaches around Grenada is that unchecked mining is actually causing the earth to sink into the sea! I'm not denying climate change, but I think the sea level rising thing is overplayed. Thank God for the Carenage lol!

Offline

#7 Jan 09, 2017 11:44 am

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Well, there is some difference in sea levels around the world. At the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal, the tide can rise as much 20 feet.  On the Caribbean Sea side 45 miles away, the difference between high tide and low tide just three feet.  This was an important question whenever  a sea level canal across the isthmus was contemplated.  The current would be a huge problem.

The difference is caused because there is no connection between those waters for many thousands of miles and the impact of the moon effects the oceans differently at different times.  Furthermore, tides are affected by landmasses and water depth.

That said there should be no tide or sea level differences any place on Grenada.  It is too small to make a difference.

Offline

#8 Jan 09, 2017 12:31 pm

gripe
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

I, too, love the Carenage! But, to address the broader question of sea level rise, beyond Grenada and the Carenage, please absorb the material at this link: http://www.space.com/30379-nasa-sea-lev … video.html

Offline

#9 Jan 09, 2017 1:18 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Sea levels were about 400 feet lower a mere 18,000 years ago.  You could walk from Siberia to Alaska or from France to England in those days.   About 100,000 years ago they were about where they are now.

So, yeah, sea levels rise and fall over time.  Sometimes abruptly.  It is just something we have to deal with.

Offline

#10 Jan 09, 2017 1:31 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Sand mining at Galby

Gripe, your video title is "New NASA Model Maps Sea Level Rise Like Never Before".   That is just not true and is an absurd claim.  During the last glacial maximum - a time when modern humans had made it to every continent except Antarctica - sea levels were hundreds of feet below where they are today.   This was just 14,000 to 18,000 years ago: A blink of the eye in geologic history.  Here is what the map of Europe would have looked like then...

17f445bfb9ea64fb0953d2de191353b0.jpg

It is preposterous to argue that sea levels are rising like never before.  They rose dramatically just a few thousand years ago.

I wonder how many villages and archaeological sites from ancient Doggerland and hidden beneath the North Sea.

Last edited by Real Distwalker (Jan 09, 2017 1:35 pm)

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB