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#1 May 20, 2018 11:32 am

Real Distwalker
Active

I told you.

I know it is fun to pick on the United States for being fat. Who doesn't enjoy that? I have told you before, however, that the rest of the Civilized world is just a generation behind the United States.

We are one generation ahead because we came out of World War II in better shape. We have had one more generation of superabundance. But the rest of the world is catching up. Witness.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article … tates.html

As superabundance becomes more common, the rest of the world will catch up as well.

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#2 May 20, 2018 12:05 pm

gripe
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Re: I told you.

RD, two responses.

First, if we believe Mr. Simon Capewell, the problem can be easily resolved if the British stick to their cultural norms and not adopt the Americans'. Here is the basis for my comment:

"Simon Capewell, a professor in public health and policy at Liverpool University, said: 'Our worst fears have come to pass. We have completely adopted the American lifestyle with the inevitable consequences. The government needs to stand up for our children."

Second, don't you think that it is a stretch for you, using only the British example that you provided, to state that "the rest of the world is catching up"? Would the U.S. really be dethroned? See this link for a comparison of worldwide obesity rates (with the U.S. 30.6% at the top): http://www.nationmaster.com/country-inf … th/Obesity

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#3 May 20, 2018 12:42 pm

New Historian
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Re: I told you.

RD you're wrong, obesity has nothing to do with wealth, it has all to with diets. Look at the list of top 20 porkers worldwide, there's not many super-rich countries among that lot. When you see the MOUNTAINS of starch that Caribbean folk eat, everything fried in cheap oil, KFC, no wonder there's so much obesity, diabetes and other health issues. But these are cheap foods, it costs more to live healthy.


Fatties.jpg

Last edited by New Historian (May 20, 2018 12:49 pm)

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#4 May 20, 2018 1:12 pm

gripe
Active

Re: I told you.

NH, next time give your source. Anyway, your comment per the data that you provided is misleading because what you provided appears to be based on obesity rates per percentage of the population. In raw, hard numbers, however, the U.S. is still the most obese country! See the data, including some mirroring what you posted, at this link:

https://renewbariatrics.com/obesity-rank-by-countries/

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#5 May 20, 2018 1:23 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: I told you.

Both data fundamentally the same. How else are you to measure obesity than by percentage? Sure America has more fat people, that's because they have more people.

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#6 May 20, 2018 2:04 pm

houston
Active

Re: I told you.

This is interesting data. I don't blame the burgers so much as the fries and sodas that go with them. Although the man really does need to change up his diet.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nat … 582854002/

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#7 May 20, 2018 4:22 pm

gripe
Active

Re: I told you.

NH, I don't think that the data is fundamentally the same. The critical issue is the % of population dynamic because it can really scream too much. Imagine, for simplicity, a small country 100 people and 30 people are obese so that the country's obesity percentage is 30%. That would make that country look very bad compared to a more developed country with a population of 100,000 of which 20,000 are obese. In that scenario, that developed country has a 20% obesity problem only because of their population size. But . . . can you in your right mind tell me that the obesity problem is more severe in the smaller country than the more developed country? I cannot endorse that thinking.

As you know, there are a number of factors that account for the worldwide obesity problem. In your first post earlier you stated that: "Caribbean folk eat, everything fried in cheap oil, KFC, no wonder there's so much obesity, diabetes and other health issues. But these are cheap foods, it costs more to live healthy." Yet, NH, in the very developed United States, here is what a recent OECD study stated:

"Obesity has been rising more rapidly in less-educated men and in average-educated women, in most countries. However, in the United States, rates have been increasing most rapidly among high-educated people."  https://www.oecd.org/els/health-systems … e-2017.pdf

I consider the last sentence from the above quote to mean, given your comment about the Caribbean, that even with access to GOOD, EXPENSIVE FOOD AND, ARGUABLY, THE ABILITY TO DINE ON THOSE AT WILL (maybe regularly), obesity is STILL a problem in the U.S. for "high-educated people".

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#8 May 20, 2018 4:38 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: I told you.

Yes, it is all about percentages, when it comes to statistics "size doesn't matter". Your small country with 30 fat people will have all the same problems that larger countries have: finding the money to pay for the health problems of their obese population. I don't know why you can't see that.

Kinda surprised about the educated Americans being more obese, I guess the so called healthy food craze doesn't account for squat.

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#9 May 20, 2018 5:32 pm

houston
Active

Re: I told you.

The power of advertising is a major factor in obesity. The junk food lords know how to push their products onto the junkies.
Healthy food is less expensive and tastes so much better, but not so convenient as a chocolate bar or bag of chips.
Surely without the waste, there is enough healthy food on this planet to feed every empty stomach with nutrition. The sugar and fat addicts need to stop feeding their face with donuts.

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#10 May 20, 2018 7:37 pm

gripe
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Re: I told you.

NH, how in heaven's name could a scenario that I described lead you to conclude that the smaller country's problem would be the same as the larger country's where they -- the larger country -- would have to service a tremendously greater obese population than the smaller country? At a most basic level, 100 is always more than 10 and therefore much more resources -- in raw terms -- would be needed to address the problems of the country where there are more obese people. You may be assuming that the smaller country has very limited resources that would be diverted to care for those of their citizens who are obese. That assumption may not be accurate. Possibly, the smaller country may have significant resources and can easily help those of its citizens that are obese. Further, it may be the case that the larger country would NOT have the resources to treat its obese citizens. In that case, with its significantly larger numbers that are obese, compared to the smaller country, the larger country may be much worse off than the smaller country in my hypothetical.

Last edited by gripe (May 20, 2018 7:39 pm)

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