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#11 Jun 09, 2018 11:46 am

Real Distwalker
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Re: RD, have you checked

Yeah, I flubbed that with a dumb typo.  You know what I meant.

Photosynthesis consumes CO2 and by combining it with H20 manufactures C6H12O6, glucose.  The extra oxygen is released as a waste product.   Any tree with green leaves does that including mature trees.  Living trees are not in stasis at all.

When the plant material decomposes, the carbon is released back in the atmpsphere.

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#12 Jun 09, 2018 3:18 pm

Expat
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Re: RD, have you checked

Real Distwalker wrote:

Yeah, I flubbed that with a dumb typo.  You know what I meant.

Photosynthesis consumes CO2 and by combining it with H20 manufactures C6H12O6, glucose.  The extra oxygen is released as a waste product.   Any tree with green leaves does that including mature trees.  Living trees are not in stasis at all.

When the plant material decomposes, the carbon is released back in the atmpsphere.

I have taken council from my local font of wisdom, and it was put to me that I over stated a tad. Stasis, as you say is incorrect. But it was close enough in my interpretation, as if we have a scale of efficiency of a 100, then young trees would be at 100, and mature trees would be more like 25, so while they are contributing, it simply isn't as effective as a sapling.

Also while carbon is released, it wont all be going into the atmosphere otherwise how do we explain those oil reserves created by compressed rotting lumber.

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#13 Jun 09, 2018 3:48 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: RD, have you checked

Let me assure you, the leaves that fall off my maples and oaks each year aren't becoming oil.

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#14 Jun 09, 2018 3:56 pm

Expat
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Re: RD, have you checked

Real Distwalker wrote:

Let me assure you, the leaves that fall off my maples and oaks each year aren't becoming oil.

But maybe the forests at the edges of Siberia out sight - will?  Does a leaf make a noise when it falls in the forest if no one is there to hear it?

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#15 Jun 09, 2018 4:11 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: RD, have you checked

I don't know but I think the situation in the Carboniferous Period when the oil fields were set down was a bit different than today.

Quoting Wiki...

The large coal deposits of the Carboniferous may owe their existence primarily to two factors. The first of these is the appearance of wood tissue and bark-bearing trees. The evolution of the wood fiber lignin and the bark-sealing, waxy substance suberin variously opposed decay organisms so effectively that dead materials accumulated long enough to fossilise on a large scale. The second factor was the lower sea levels that occurred during the Carboniferous as compared to the preceding Devonian period. This promoted the development of extensive lowland swamps and forests in North America and Europe. Based on a genetic analysis of mushroom fungi, it was proposed that large quantities of wood were buried during this period because animals and decomposing bacteria had not yet evolved enzymes that could effectively digest the resistant phenolic lignin polymers and waxy suberin polymers. They suggest that fungi that could break those substances down effectively only became dominant towards the end of the period, making subsequent coal formation much rarer.

The Carboniferous trees made extensive use of lignin. They had bark to wood ratios of 8 to 1, and even as high as 20 to 1. This compares to modern values less than 1 to 4. This bark, which must have been used as support as well as protection, probably had 38% to 58% lignin. Lignin is insoluble, too large to pass through cell walls, too heterogeneous for specific enzymes, and toxic, so that few organisms other than Basidiomycetes fungi can degrade it. To oxidize it requires an atmosphere of greater than 5% oxygen, or compounds such as peroxides. It can linger in soil for thousands of years and its toxic breakdown products inhibit decay of other substances.[20] One possible reason for its high percentages in plants at that time was to provide protection from insects in a world containing very effective insect herbivores (but nothing remotely as effective as modern insectivores) and probably many fewer protective toxins produced naturally by plants than exist today. As a result, undegraded carbon built up, resulting in the extensive burial of biologically fixed carbon, leading to an increase in oxygen levels in the atmosphere; estimates place the peak oxygen content as high as 35%, as compared to 21% today.[21] This oxygen level may have increased wildfire activity. It also may have promoted gigantism of insects and amphibians — creatures that have been constrained in size by respiratory systems that are limited in their physiological ability to transport and distribute oxygen at the lower atmospheric concentrations that have since been available.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbonife … s_and_coal

Last edited by Real Distwalker (Jun 09, 2018 4:14 pm)

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#16 Jun 09, 2018 6:57 pm

Expat
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Re: RD, have you checked

Not to worry, there have been several all but total extinction prior to the Dinosaur departure, I bet once we have nuked ourselves out of existence it will all come round again.

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#17 Jun 12, 2018 6:37 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: RD, have you checked

Yep.  Fires in the Congo region...

https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/godd … -the-congo

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#18 Jun 12, 2018 6:49 pm

Expat
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Re: RD, have you checked

That was 2016, but I suppose something similar is happening now. That looks crazy.

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#19 Jun 12, 2018 9:15 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: RD, have you checked

If you read the text, it is annual fires set in June so I am pretty certain it is the same thing.  Besides, what else could it be.

I have spent hours playing with the link you posted.

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#20 Jun 13, 2018 10:31 am

Expat
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Re: RD, have you checked

Real Distwalker wrote:

If you read the text, it is annual fires set in June so I am pretty certain it is the same thing.  Besides, what else could it be.

I have spent hours playing with the link you posted.

Me, read text, moi... unlikely... smile

Glad to have provided something to while away those long hours sitting by the camp fire on the prairie... LoL.

It has been my main resource getting the feel for up coming tropical waves and depressions before they get a mention with NOAA.

Last edited by Expat (Jun 13, 2018 10:32 am)

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