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#1 Jun 12, 2018 4:15 pm

New Historian
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White rum, saltfish, souse and sweat

Some of my enduring childhood memories are the smells of Auntie’s rumshop on a Friday night: white rum, saltfish, souse, and sweat. Us boys would wedge ourselves into a corner and try to remain unseen while listening to the ebb and flow of “ole talk” around us. Because to be noticed by Auntie would mean being banished with a switch across your backside for sneaking around big people business.

But a lash from feeble Auntie was nothing compared to the real terror that lay ahead: the walk home. This was long before street lighting came to our village, and on a moonless night it would be pitch black. You had to stumble down the road, feeling your way in the blackness. Our heads would be filled with tales of local demons such as Loup Garoux (or ligaroo, a werewolf), La Diablesse (a beautiful lady whose long dress hides a cloven hoof), and Sucuyant (an old lady who peels off her skin and turns into a ball of fire).

As we went stumbling down the path from the shop to the house, my big brothers would give me some new piece of terrifying information about these demons – then make a run for it, leaving me bawling in the dark.

“Wait for meeee!!”

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#2 Jun 12, 2018 5:06 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: White rum, saltfish, souse and sweat

Good stuff.  It seems like things are similar everywhere with just different flavors.  Kids have those kind of haunts in the night fears everywhere. 

That is one thing my childhood seems to be missing.  I remember my grandmother saying that there is "no such thing as haunts" and that was that.  The staunchly Protestant, pioneer, farming sensibility in her wouldn't stand for any kind of nonsense like ghosts. We grew up in my part of the rural midwest without ligaroo of any kind.  I feel like I missed out. sad

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#3 Jun 12, 2018 7:08 pm

Expat
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Re: White rum, saltfish, souse and sweat

New Historian wrote:

Some of my enduring childhood memories are the smells of Auntie’s rumshop on a Friday night: white rum, saltfish, souse, and sweat. Us boys would wedge ourselves into a corner and try to remain unseen while listening to the ebb and flow of “ole talk” around us. Because to be noticed by Auntie would mean being banished with a switch across your backside for sneaking around big people business.

But a lash from feeble Auntie was nothing compared to the real terror that lay ahead: the walk home. This was long before street lighting came to our village, and on a moonless night it would be pitch black. You had to stumble down the road, feeling your way in the blackness. Our heads would be filled with tales of local demons such as Loup Garoux (or ligaroo, a werewolf), La Diablesse (a beautiful lady whose long dress hides a cloven hoof), and Sucuyant (an old lady who peels off her skin and turns into a ball of fire).

As we went stumbling down the path from the shop to the house, my big brothers would give me some new piece of terrifying information about these demons – then make a run for it, leaving me bawling in the dark.

“Wait for meeee!!”


You really have to put a tick against those anecdotes as you use them Mr.

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#4 Jun 12, 2018 7:27 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: White rum, saltfish, souse and sweat

Expat wrote:
New Historian wrote:

Some of my enduring childhood memories are the smells of Auntie’s rumshop on a Friday night: white rum, saltfish, souse, and sweat. Us boys would wedge ourselves into a corner and try to remain unseen while listening to the ebb and flow of “ole talk” around us. Because to be noticed by Auntie would mean being banished with a switch across your backside for sneaking around big people business.

But a lash from feeble Auntie was nothing compared to the real terror that lay ahead: the walk home. This was long before street lighting came to our village, and on a moonless night it would be pitch black. You had to stumble down the road, feeling your way in the blackness. Our heads would be filled with tales of local demons such as Loup Garoux (or ligaroo, a werewolf), La Diablesse (a beautiful lady whose long dress hides a cloven hoof), and Sucuyant (an old lady who peels off her skin and turns into a ball of fire).

As we went stumbling down the path from the shop to the house, my big brothers would give me some new piece of terrifying information about these demons – then make a run for it, leaving me bawling in the dark.

“Wait for meeee!!”


You really have to put a tick against those anecdotes as you use them Mr.

Lawd not again sad

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#5 Jun 12, 2018 7:44 pm

Dancer
Active

Re: White rum, saltfish, souse and sweat

New Historian  that 'ghost story' was your  break-out  ' short story '

....  when can we see a continuation
..............like running in the dark screaming  , wait for me , wait for me  , and fall into Mrs Bailey's cess  pool pit. lol.

Last edited by Dancer (Jun 12, 2018 7:49 pm)

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