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#1 Aug 27, 2018 4:34 pm

New Historian
Active

Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Going to Nigeria is always stressful, starting with just getting the visa. The Federal Republic of Nigeria has a strict policy: they do not issue visas on arrival, period. You have to send your passport into the nearest Nigerian Embassy and it takes at least a week to get it back. This of course is an enormous pain in the butt for people who travel all the time - who do they think they are, America? Getting a flight is the next hurdle: they are always full and the first to fill up is first class. Nigerians don’t travel in economy!

Then there is Lagos Airport. They have cleaned it up now but the stories of the overcrowding, theft and corruption at this hellhole were legendary: unsuspecting visitors could find themselves sliced, diced and fleeced before they even left the airport compound! An American colleague of mine foolishly got into an unknown taxi because “he looked honest” – 12 hours later they found him wandering the back streets of Ikeja, bereft of everything. On my first trip to Lagos I was met by the driver in the arrivals hall and shepherded to his waiting old Benz. As we drove out of the car park we were joined by the police escort. I thought: this is a bit of overkill isn’t it? Talk about drawing attention to myself: here I am, come and rob me!

But for all the crime and chaos I like Nigeria, a lot. The place has a buzz about it, to put it mildly. Lagos is like a bigger version of Kingston – on steroids! Nigerians are a confident, aggressive and gregarious people – all of which have positive and negative aspects Most of my time was spent in Abuja the Federal Capital. With its clean wide streets and sense of order, I would live in Abuja in a heartbeat. Not so sure about Lagos though!

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#2 Aug 28, 2018 1:03 am

Calypso
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

New Historian wrote:

Going to Nigeria is always stressful, starting with just getting the visa. The Federal Republic of Nigeria has a strict policy: they do not issue visas on arrival, period. You have to send your passport into the nearest Nigerian Embassy and it takes at least a week to get it back. This of course is an enormous pain in the butt for people who travel all the time - who do they think they are, America? Getting a flight is the next hurdle: they are always full and the first to fill up is first class. Nigerians don’t travel in economy!

Then there is Lagos Airport. They have cleaned it up now but the stories of the overcrowding, theft and corruption at this hellhole were legendary: unsuspecting visitors could find themselves sliced, diced and fleeced before they even left the airport compound! An American colleague of mine foolishly got into an unknown taxi because “he looked honest” – 12 hours later they found him wandering the back streets of Ikeja, bereft of everything. On my first trip to Lagos I was met by the driver in the arrivals hall and shepherded to his waiting old Benz. As we drove out of the car park we were joined by the police escort. I thought: this is a bit of overkill isn’t it? Talk about drawing attention to myself: here I am, come and rob me!

But for all the crime and chaos I like Nigeria, a lot. The place has a buzz about it, to put it mildly. Lagos is like a bigger version of Kingston – on steroids! Nigerians are a confident, aggressive and gregarious people – all of which have positive and negative aspects Most of my time was spent in Abuja the Federal Capital. With its clean wide streets and sense of order, I would live in Abuja in a heartbeat. Not so sure about Lagos though!


I wouldn't want to live in Africa but I dream of teaching English in Kenya for an entire summer.  It is never wise to go to any country and just hail a taxi, you'll put your life in danger. I always ask my travel agent to have a car take me to the hotel and drop me back there.

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#3 Aug 28, 2018 10:53 am

Expat
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Calypso wrote:
New Historian wrote:

Going to Nigeria is always stressful, starting with just getting the visa. The Federal Republic of Nigeria has a strict policy: they do not issue visas on arrival, period. You have to send your passport into the nearest Nigerian Embassy and it takes at least a week to get it back. This of course is an enormous pain in the butt for people who travel all the time - who do they think they are, America? Getting a flight is the next hurdle: they are always full and the first to fill up is first class. Nigerians don’t travel in economy!

Then there is Lagos Airport. They have cleaned it up now but the stories of the overcrowding, theft and corruption at this hellhole were legendary: unsuspecting visitors could find themselves sliced, diced and fleeced before they even left the airport compound! An American colleague of mine foolishly got into an unknown taxi because “he looked honest” – 12 hours later they found him wandering the back streets of Ikeja, bereft of everything. On my first trip to Lagos I was met by the driver in the arrivals hall and shepherded to his waiting old Benz. As we drove out of the car park we were joined by the police escort. I thought: this is a bit of overkill isn’t it? Talk about drawing attention to myself: here I am, come and rob me!

But for all the crime and chaos I like Nigeria, a lot. The place has a buzz about it, to put it mildly. Lagos is like a bigger version of Kingston – on steroids! Nigerians are a confident, aggressive and gregarious people – all of which have positive and negative aspects Most of my time was spent in Abuja the Federal Capital. With its clean wide streets and sense of order, I would live in Abuja in a heartbeat. Not so sure about Lagos though!


I wouldn't want to live in Africa but I dream of teaching English in Kenya for an entire summer.  It is never wise to go to any country and just hail a taxi, you'll put your life in danger. I always ask my travel agent to have a car take me to the hotel and drop me back there.


So what makes you think they speak English any less well than Jamaicans or Grenadians?

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#4 Aug 28, 2018 11:45 am

Calypso
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Expat wrote:
Calypso wrote:
New Historian wrote:

Going to Nigeria is always stressful, starting with just getting the visa. The Federal Republic of Nigeria has a strict policy: they do not issue visas on arrival, period. You have to send your passport into the nearest Nigerian Embassy and it takes at least a week to get it back. This of course is an enormous pain in the butt for people who travel all the time - who do they think they are, America? Getting a flight is the next hurdle: they are always full and the first to fill up is first class. Nigerians don’t travel in economy!

Then there is Lagos Airport. They have cleaned it up now but the stories of the overcrowding, theft and corruption at this hellhole were legendary: unsuspecting visitors could find themselves sliced, diced and fleeced before they even left the airport compound! An American colleague of mine foolishly got into an unknown taxi because “he looked honest” – 12 hours later they found him wandering the back streets of Ikeja, bereft of everything. On my first trip to Lagos I was met by the driver in the arrivals hall and shepherded to his waiting old Benz. As we drove out of the car park we were joined by the police escort. I thought: this is a bit of overkill isn’t it? Talk about drawing attention to myself: here I am, come and rob me!

But for all the crime and chaos I like Nigeria, a lot. The place has a buzz about it, to put it mildly. Lagos is like a bigger version of Kingston – on steroids! Nigerians are a confident, aggressive and gregarious people – all of which have positive and negative aspects Most of my time was spent in Abuja the Federal Capital. With its clean wide streets and sense of order, I would live in Abuja in a heartbeat. Not so sure about Lagos though!


I wouldn't want to live in Africa but I dream of teaching English in Kenya for an entire summer.  It is never wise to go to any country and just hail a taxi, you'll put your life in danger. I always ask my travel agent to have a car take me to the hotel and drop me back there.


So what makes you think they speak English any less well than Jamaicans or Grenadians?

Because they are always looking for teachers.

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#5 Aug 28, 2018 11:55 am

New Historian
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

kNOW WHAT i USED TO CALL nAIROBI? nAI-ROBBERY! cAVEAT EMPTOR.

Fuggin caps lock!!

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#6 Aug 28, 2018 12:08 pm

Calypso
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Expat wrote:
Calypso wrote:
New Historian wrote:

Going to Nigeria is always stressful, starting with just getting the visa. The Federal Republic of Nigeria has a strict policy: they do not issue visas on arrival, period. You have to send your passport into the nearest Nigerian Embassy and it takes at least a week to get it back. This of course is an enormous pain in the butt for people who travel all the time - who do they think they are, America? Getting a flight is the next hurdle: they are always full and the first to fill up is first class. Nigerians don’t travel in economy!

Then there is Lagos Airport. They have cleaned it up now but the stories of the overcrowding, theft and corruption at this hellhole were legendary: unsuspecting visitors could find themselves sliced, diced and fleeced before they even left the airport compound! An American colleague of mine foolishly got into an unknown taxi because “he looked honest” – 12 hours later they found him wandering the back streets of Ikeja, bereft of everything. On my first trip to Lagos I was met by the driver in the arrivals hall and shepherded to his waiting old Benz. As we drove out of the car park we were joined by the police escort. I thought: this is a bit of overkill isn’t it? Talk about drawing attention to myself: here I am, come and rob me!

But for all the crime and chaos I like Nigeria, a lot. The place has a buzz about it, to put it mildly. Lagos is like a bigger version of Kingston – on steroids! Nigerians are a confident, aggressive and gregarious people – all of which have positive and negative aspects Most of my time was spent in Abuja the Federal Capital. With its clean wide streets and sense of order, I would live in Abuja in a heartbeat. Not so sure about Lagos though!


I wouldn't want to live in Africa but I dream of teaching English in Kenya for an entire summer.  It is never wise to go to any country and just hail a taxi, you'll put your life in danger. I always ask my travel agent to have a car take me to the hotel and drop me back there.


So what makes you think they speak English any less well than Jamaicans or Grenadians?

https://www.seekteachers.com/articles.asp?id=252

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#7 Aug 28, 2018 12:15 pm

Dancer
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Spring in your step Calypso. ?
Ahhhh. lol.

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#8 Aug 28, 2018 1:55 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

Calypso you getting thrill seeker's syndrome in your later life lol? First of all you want to ro back to the murder capital of the Caribbean with a "Just come back, loaded with pounds" sticker on your back, now you have a hankering to go to ... LAGOS??? Like they say back home: "You see a coffin at Madden's you like?" Even Nai-Robbery a dangerous place for foreigners to go wandering, but Lagos??

Lawd someone try an' talk sense into this lady nuh?

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#9 Aug 28, 2018 2:35 pm

Calypso
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

New Historian wrote:

Calypso you getting thrill seeker's syndrome in your later life lol? First of all you want to ro back to the murder capital of the Caribbean with a "Just come back, loaded with pounds" sticker on your back, now you have a hankering to go to ... LAGOS??? Like they say back home: "You see a coffin at Madden's you like?" Even Nai-Robbery a dangerous place for foreigners to go wandering, but Lagos??

Lawd someone try an' talk sense into this lady nuh?

Africa, the continent is always looking for school teachers. It's always been on my list of things I want to do. I love Kenya and Mali the best. I also want to spend a summer in Carriacou.

Last edited by Calypso (Aug 28, 2018 2:36 pm)

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#10 Aug 28, 2018 2:50 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Nah-wah-oh: Nigeria!

You been to Mali? Hotbed for Boko Haram nutters these days. Apart from Timbuktu there's not a whole lot to see and do in Mali, just a whole lotta Sahara dust. My three fave African countries are Ghana, Uganda and Tanzania: rich culture and relatively safe. Mozambique is also good, but kinda out there. South Africa is a basket case: too many angry people, of all "rainbow colours".

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