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#1 Sep 16, 2018 5:01 pm

Expat
Active

Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

African participation in the slave trade
Gezo King of Dahomey.jpg
See also: Atlantic slave trade and Sara Forbes Bonetta

African states played a role in the slave trade, and slavery was a common practice among Sub Saharan Africans before the involvement of the Arabs, Berbers and Europeans. There were three types: those who were slaves through conquest, those who were slaves due to unpaid debts, or those whose parents gave them as slaves to tribal chiefs. Chieftains would barter their slaves to Arab, Berber, Ottoman or European buyers for rum, spices, cloth or other goods.[44] Selling captives or prisoners was commonly practiced among Africans, Turks, Berbers and Arabs during that era. However, as the Atlantic slave trade increased its demand, local systems which primarily serviced indentured servitude expanded. European slave trading as a result was the most pivotal change in the social, economic, cultural, spiritual, religious, political dynamics of the concept of slave trading. It ultimately undermined local economies and political stability as villages' vital labour forces were shipped overseas as slave raids and civil wars became commonplace. Crimes which were previously punishable by some other means became punishable by enslavement.[45]
The inspection and sale of a slave

Before the arrival of the Portuguese, slavery pre-existed in Kingdom of Kongo. Despite its establishment within his kingdom, Afonso I of Kongo believed that the slave trade should be subject to Kongo law. When he suspected the Portuguese of receiving illegally enslaved persons to sell, he wrote letters to the King João III of Portugal in 1526 imploring him to put a stop to the practice.[46]

The kings of Dahomey sold their war captives into transatlantic slavery, who otherwise may have been killed in a ceremony known as the Annual Customs. As one of West Africa's principal slave states, Dahomey became extremely unpopular with neighbouring peoples.[47][48][49] Like the Bambara Empire to the east, the Khasso kingdoms depended heavily on the slave trade for their economy. A family's status was indicated by the number of slaves it owned, leading to wars for the sole purpose of taking more captives. This trade led the Khasso into increasing contact with the European settlements of Africa's west coast, particularly the French.[50] Benin grew increasingly rich during the 16th and 17th centuries on the slave trade with Europe; slaves from enemy states of the interior were sold, and carried to the Americas in Dutch and Portuguese ships. The Bight of Benin's shore soon came to be known as the "Slave Coast".[51]

In the 1840s, King Gezo of Dahomey said:[10][52]

    The slave trade is the ruling principle of my people. It is the source and the glory of their wealth…the mother lulls the child to sleep with notes of triumph over an enemy reduced to slavery…

200th anniversary of the British act of parliament abolishing slave trading, commemorated on a British two pound coin.

In 1807, under internal and external pressures, the United Kingdom made illegal the international trade in slaves. The Royal Navy was deployed to prevent slavers from the United States, France, Spain, Portugal, Holland, West Africa and Arabia. The King of Bonny (now in Nigeria) allegedly became dissatisfied of the British intervention in stopping slave trading.[53]

    We think this trade must go on. That is the verdict of our oracle and the priests. They say that your country, however great, can never stop a trade ordained by God himself.

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#2 Sep 16, 2018 6:08 pm

Calypso
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Expat wrote:

African participation in the slave trade
Gezo King of Dahomey.jpg
See also: Atlantic slave trade and Sara Forbes Bonetta

African states played a role in the slave trade, and slavery was a common practice among Sub Saharan Africans before the involvement of the Arabs, Berbers and Europeans. There were three types: those who were slaves through conquest, those who were slaves due to unpaid debts, or those whose parents gave them as slaves to tribal chiefs. Chieftains would barter their slaves to Arab, Berber, Ottoman or European buyers for rum, spices, cloth or other goods.[44] Selling captives or prisoners was commonly practiced among Africans, Turks, Berbers and Arabs during that era. However, as the Atlantic slave trade increased its demand, local systems which primarily serviced indentured servitude expanded. European slave trading as a result was the most pivotal change in the social, economic, cultural, spiritual, religious, political dynamics of the concept of slave trading. It ultimately undermined local economies and political stability as villages' vital labour forces were shipped overseas as slave raids and civil wars became commonplace. Crimes which were previously punishable by some other means became punishable by enslavement.[45]
The inspection and sale of a slave

Before the arrival of the Portuguese, slavery pre-existed in Kingdom of Kongo. Despite its establishment within his kingdom, Afonso I of Kongo believed that the slave trade should be subject to Kongo law. When he suspected the Portuguese of receiving illegally enslaved persons to sell, he wrote letters to the King João III of Portugal in 1526 imploring him to put a stop to the practice.[46]

The kings of Dahomey sold their war captives into transatlantic slavery, who otherwise may have been killed in a ceremony known as the Annual Customs. As one of West Africa's principal slave states, Dahomey became extremely unpopular with neighbouring peoples.[47][48][49] Like the Bambara Empire to the east, the Khasso kingdoms depended heavily on the slave trade for their economy. A family's status was indicated by the number of slaves it owned, leading to wars for the sole purpose of taking more captives. This trade led the Khasso into increasing contact with the European settlements of Africa's west coast, particularly the French.[50] Benin grew increasingly rich during the 16th and 17th centuries on the slave trade with Europe; slaves from enemy states of the interior were sold, and carried to the Americas in Dutch and Portuguese ships. The Bight of Benin's shore soon came to be known as the "Slave Coast".[51]

In the 1840s, King Gezo of Dahomey said:[10][52]

    The slave trade is the ruling principle of my people. It is the source and the glory of their wealth…the mother lulls the child to sleep with notes of triumph over an enemy reduced to slavery…

200th anniversary of the British act of parliament abolishing slave trading, commemorated on a British two pound coin.

In 1807, under internal and external pressures, the United Kingdom made illegal the international trade in slaves. The Royal Navy was deployed to prevent slavers from the United States, France, Spain, Portugal, Holland, West Africa and Arabia. The King of Bonny (now in Nigeria) allegedly became dissatisfied of the British intervention in stopping slave trading.[53]

    We think this trade must go on. That is the verdict of our oracle and the priests. They say that your country, however great, can never stop a trade ordained by God himself.


Gezo is well-known for his ignorance of selling his captured enemies to the Europeans. But I have mentioned that IF THE EUROPEANS CONSIDERED THE AFRICANS TO BE SAVAGES THEIR BRUTALLY TOWARD THE AFRICANS MARKED THEM AS THE TRUE SAVAGES!

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#3 Sep 16, 2018 8:37 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

They were all a product of their time.

Just as Biafra, Congo and sundry other bloody periods in Recent times in Africa would mark them still as savages dragging their cutlass along the ground..... Or Bosnians and Serbians trying to annihilate each other if you want to talk about animal or horrendous cruelty among Europeans.

I am sorry, Africans got used and abused, and the whole episode is shame worthy, and abhorrent. But in any other situation the blacks would have been just as bad or just as good as the whites in what ever the situation was. blacks do not have any moral high ground. If they did they wouldn't be trying to eradicate each other in turf wars all over America Britain and anywhere else you care to think of.

Mankind is an animal just like the Lion. the Dear and the Crocodile. Through evolution we have expanded our thinking processes, can walk upright, and have developed more intricate ways of communicating, But those primal urges of lust and anger are not far from the surface for some of our kin. Pack mentality reigns... hence them and us. Whether it is racial, or territorial.  We are a civilisation on the edge of self inhalation.

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#4 Sep 17, 2018 7:12 am

Mary Seacole/deportees
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Expat wrote:

African participation in the slave trade
Gezo King of Dahomey.jpg
See also: Atlantic slave trade and Sara Forbes Bonetta

African states played a role in the slave trade, and slavery was a common practice among Sub Saharan Africans before the involvement of the Arabs, Berbers and Europeans. There were three types: those who were slaves through conquest, those who were slaves due to unpaid debts, or those whose parents gave them as slaves to tribal chiefs. Chieftains would barter their slaves to Arab, Berber, Ottoman or European buyers for rum, spices, cloth or other goods.[44] Selling captives or prisoners was commonly practiced among Africans, Turks, Berbers and Arabs during that era. However, as the Atlantic slave trade increased its demand, local systems which primarily serviced indentured servitude expanded. European slave trading as a result was the most pivotal change in the social, economic, cultural, spiritual, religious, political dynamics of the concept of slave trading. It ultimately undermined local economies and political stability as villages' vital labour forces were shipped overseas as slave raids and civil wars became commonplace. Crimes which were previously punishable by some other means became punishable by enslavement.[45]
The inspection and sale of a slave

Before the arrival of the Portuguese, slavery pre-existed in Kingdom of Kongo. Despite its establishment within his kingdom, Afonso I of Kongo believed that the slave trade should be subject to Kongo law. When he suspected the Portuguese of receiving illegally enslaved persons to sell, he wrote letters to the King João III of Portugal in 1526 imploring him to put a stop to the practice.[46]

The kings of Dahomey sold their war captives into transatlantic slavery, who otherwise may have been killed in a ceremony known as the Annual Customs. As one of West Africa's principal slave states, Dahomey became extremely unpopular with neighbouring peoples.[47][48][49] Like the Bambara Empire to the east, the Khasso kingdoms depended heavily on the slave trade for their economy. A family's status was indicated by the number of slaves it owned, leading to wars for the sole purpose of taking more captives. This trade led the Khasso into increasing contact with the European settlements of Africa's west coast, particularly the French.[50] Benin grew increasingly rich during the 16th and 17th centuries on the slave trade with Europe; slaves from enemy states of the interior were sold, and carried to the Americas in Dutch and Portuguese ships. The Bight of Benin's shore soon came to be known as the "Slave Coast".[51]

In the 1840s, King Gezo of Dahomey said:[10][52]

    The slave trade is the ruling principle of my people. It is the source and the glory of their wealth…the mother lulls the child to sleep with notes of triumph over an enemy reduced to slavery…

200th anniversary of the British act of parliament abolishing slave trading, commemorated on a British two pound coin.

In 1807, under internal and external pressures, the United Kingdom made illegal the international trade in slaves. The Royal Navy was deployed to prevent slavers from the United States, France, Spain, Portugal, Holland, West Africa and Arabia. The King of Bonny (now in Nigeria) allegedly became dissatisfied of the British intervention in stopping slave trading.[53]

    We think this trade must go on. That is the verdict of our oracle and the priests. They say that your country, however great, can never stop a trade ordained by God himself.

  History is not always correct take for example the different translations and meaning of the kings James VERSION . IT all depend on who wrote what. For Example the Lord is my shepherd has taken a different twist in meaning also,
The Africans denied all this written allegations in a blog which will go down as history as well
The Africans said this is a way to divide the black race further .
In school in Grenada we read history like it was a story and not about us. But I suppose the world is getting more  conscious  every day.
The slave trade? What slave trade?
You mean the Jewish Holacast?
Nobody talks about the slave trade
My dear stick up for your people  whether they are wrong or right
Thumps up!!!

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#5 Sep 17, 2018 7:33 am

Mary Seacole/deportees
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Well generally speaking I found out there are people who will create suffering for others for their own entertainment .
I know it's sad inhumane and cruel and I won't create such for anyone but it's good to have knowledge and understand things it affects you less
To understand what goes on in the mind of others as the creator make a it unfold and manifest before your eyes based on your spirit .  I am not laughing o please yes I am crying as we speak . I look confused  and running outside naked at the moment  or maybe I am chopping meat to season  . Poor souls hàaaaaa now  thats crazy '  I did say who laugh last laugh best.  Praise Jah

Last edited by Mary Seacole/deportees (Sep 17, 2018 7:41 am)

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#6 Sep 17, 2018 7:43 am

Mary Seacole/deportees
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Love  your enemies and pray for them or you will become like them
Heavy Load carriers

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#7 Sep 17, 2018 5:08 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Well why not blame the Europeans - are they without blame? Let's face it, there's plenty of blame to go around, and yes Africans themselves must share a portion of that blame. But a minor portion: who enticed them to sell their own people? Let's face it, everywhere the white man went in the world, they've left a legacy of rape and pillage: there never was such a thing as "benign colonialism". Every non-white race on the planet has got some beef with white people - for the most part justified. So take it on the chin and suck it up.

The Jews never let the world forget - and pay for - what happened to them in WW2, but yet somehow the African race is told that the wrongs perpetrated them are beyond some invisible statute of limitations: move on, fergetabout it. Well we can't forget about it, slavery casts a long shadow.

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#8 Sep 17, 2018 9:03 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

New Historian wrote:

Well why not blame the Europeans - are they without blame? Let's face it, there's plenty of blame to go around, and yes Africans themselves must share a portion of that blame. But a minor portion: who enticed them to sell their own people? Let's face it, everywhere the white man went in the world, they've left a legacy of rape and pillage: there never was such a thing as "benign colonialism". Every non-white race on the planet has got some beef with white people - for the most part justified. So take it on the chin and suck it up.

The Jews never let the world forget - and pay for - what happened to them in WW2, but yet somehow the African race is told that the wrongs perpetrated them are beyond some invisible statute of limitations: move on, fergetabout it. Well we can't forget about it, slavery casts a long shadow.

The main thing with the Jews was there was often a traceable link to property that was pillaged.

No one is denying "European" involvement. What is often either denied or down played like just now, is the African involvement.... It wasn't me. syndrome.

I stand ready for correction, but I am under the impression there were very few White raiding parties for slave gathering. They were basically all traded... one article I read... I am not RD, so don't expect a traceable reference, but in that article One tribe near the coast which had a diverse population spread around the region even took and sold members of the far flung tribe... the same tribe as themselves, but unknown socially to them... to the slavers.... never mind war captives or what ever from another tribe.

Without the complicity of the Africans selling their own, the Europeans simply could not have managed the numbers they did. Lets face it Africans hunting Africans knowing how and where they live must be more effective than mosquito weakened sailors heading off into unknown territory where they could be ambushed.

Own it dude. Their is enough guilt to go round.

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#9 Sep 17, 2018 9:49 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

Did you read what I wrote? I fully acknowledge the contributory guilt of the African. But that is subsidiary to the overweening, systemic guilt of the European powers, who spared no evil in subjugating the "New World" (although it had been there for eons before they stumbled across it) and bending them to Europe's will, even if that meant wiping them out in the name of "God". Did you read about the Conquistadors? Columbus? The genocide of the American Indian?

"Slavery" of a sort had existed in Africa for generations before the white man came, but it was nowhere near the systematized brutality of plantation slavery in the New World: the Africans had no idea of the real horrors they were consigning their fellow Africans to. Like I said: I'm not absolving them of blame - but "yours" is greater.

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#10 Sep 18, 2018 8:37 am

Slice
Active

Re: Go on Blame the Europeans... it's easier that way.

In a way, I am thankful for slavery.  Doh get me wrong, slavery was extremely brutal and also inhuman, yet there are some kind of benefits.

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