You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the one and only Spiceislander Talkshop.

#1 Apr 21, 2019 11:27 am

gripe
Active

Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

The "Titan of the post-Independence Caribbean" is well-remembered in the following tribute:

https://www.nowgrenada.com/2019/04/sir- … -has-died/

Here are segments of other tributes to the late Mr. McIntyre:

"Shocking is the news that our Sir Alister has passed. Larger than life in his long sojourn, it is difficult to embrace the finality of this existential fragility.  The people of the Caribbean, and their University of the West Indies — which he served as Vice-Chancellor— will not be impoverished by his transition because the phenomenal richness of his contributions to their growth and transformation will continue to yield development dividends deep into the future,” Sir Hilary said in a condolence message. . .

The Grenadian born, Sir Alister served as Vice Chancellor emeritus of the UWI. An economist by training, he graduated from the London School of Economics and Political Science with first class honours." Source: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/latestne … r_McIntyre

Condolences to "Puggy" and Mr. McIntyre's entire family.

Offline

#2 Apr 22, 2019 1:44 pm

Calypso
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

gripe wrote:

The "Titan of the post-Independence Caribbean" is well-remembered in the following tribute:

https://www.nowgrenada.com/2019/04/sir- … -has-died/

Here are segments of other tributes to the late Mr. McIntyre:

"Shocking is the news that our Sir Alister has passed. Larger than life in his long sojourn, it is difficult to embrace the finality of this existential fragility.  The people of the Caribbean, and their University of the West Indies — which he served as Vice-Chancellor— will not be impoverished by his transition because the phenomenal richness of his contributions to their growth and transformation will continue to yield development dividends deep into the future,” Sir Hilary said in a condolence message. . .

The Grenadian born, Sir Alister served as Vice Chancellor emeritus of the UWI. An economist by training, he graduated from the London School of Economics and Political Science with first class honours." Source: http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/latestne … r_McIntyre

Condolences to "Puggy" and Mr. McIntyre's entire family.

Mixed-race men like Sir Alister, Busta, Manley, etc from the Caribbean really made an impact on the history of the region. Many have asked me, why mixed-race? i mentioned that they were the educated class, a legacy left by European colonialism.  When the British came, they brought with them a rigid class system like the Spaniards' Ecomienda heirarchy. The Negroes were at the lowest of the scale. The mixed-race came before us. They, with their African blood, paved the way for authentic blacks to enter the middle-class.

Online

#3 Apr 22, 2019 7:17 pm

gripe
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Calypso, by your response, I will assume that you knew about Mr. McIntyre's contribution to the region even before the lead post. Even if you didn't, it is enough that you've responded to the post.

Maybe the Grenadians on this forum have so far chosen to remain silent on Mr. McIntyre's passing but still appreciate his accomplishments and efforts on behalf of the Caribbean.

Your point, Calypso, about "Mixed-race men" in the Caribbean touches a reality that West Indians can't ignore. Grenada's relatively recent history is testament to your comment.

Offline

#4 Apr 22, 2019 9:53 pm

houston
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Calypso, your racism really stinks each and every time you post.
What exactly is an authentic black?
You claim to be an educator. Really hope that you are not in charge of teaching young ones.

Offline

#5 Apr 23, 2019 12:39 am

gripe
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Houston, I did not see a negative slant in Calypso's statements about the Slavery-generated "rigid class system" where slaves were at the bottom and "the mixed-race came before us". The fact that Calypso included herself among the "us" should leave no doubt about those with whom she identifies. Calypso goes further, I believe, to see those individuals, her own, as "authentic blacks" (those that are not "mixed race").

While the term "authentic blacks" can, on the surface, be controversial for lack of clarity, no hurt should be felt if the term was intended by Calypso to describe all Blacks who are not "mixed-race".

The fact is that slavery created many labels.

Slavery also ensured that favoured skin color benefitted consistent with established privileges.

With her post to which you responded, Houston, I do not consider Calypso to be sowing any racist seeds.

Offline

#6 Apr 23, 2019 2:58 am

Calypso
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

houston wrote:

Calypso, your racism really stinks each and every time you post.
What exactly is an authentic black?
You claim to be an educator. Really hope that you are not in charge of teaching young ones.

I think what is so sad is how blasted ignorant you are!! You lack knowledge like my 12 year-olds who profess to know it all. The Caribbean has a color shade hierachy that was left by the colonial powers. If you have some European blood you were considered better than a person with pure African blood. Latin American countries have it worst because they were colonized by the Spaniards who invented the system to keep down the Indians. " Busta" and Manley, etc are from that class. They paved the way for people with mosly african bood to get into politics.

Online

#7 Apr 27, 2019 5:10 pm

houston
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Oh come on, it's the 21st century. Are people really still being measured by the shade of thier skin? Not so much in North America and Europe anymore but more likely in South America, Central America and the Caribbean does skin colour, ethnicity and religion matter on the scale of hierarchy.

Offline

#8 Apr 28, 2019 8:59 am

Slice
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

But Kaiso, what the F$%k mixed race have to do with it? I met the man on ah number of occasion, and he never saw himself as race.  He did not even see himself as ah Grenadian, he saw himself as ah Caribbean man. When are we going to stop injecting race in every aspects of ourselves?

Offline

#9 Apr 30, 2019 11:37 pm

gripe
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Slice, the following excerpt on the history of the races in Jamaica following Emancipation --  https://scholar.library.miami.edu/emanc … lture4.htm  -- should put into proper perspective Calypso's statement to which both you and houston have objected:

"Following the emancipation of all enslaved Africans in 1834, the island of Jamaica was left in a stage of rebuilding.  Religion, education, and family structure were all in disarray and were in need of reconstruction.  With their new-found freedom, people also had the task of establishing a new way of life that would allow them prosperity and fulfillment.  However, the group that faced the most complex rebuilding process was the so-called “people of color.”  People of color, who were a result of “miscegenation,” or sexual relationships between people of African and European descent, faced the challenge of readjusting in the midst of distinct color lines on the island.  They faced particular challenges in the areas of politics, marriage and family, and child education.

During slavery, white slave owners fathered numerous children with black slaves, and generations of children of mixed race heritage were the result.  White observers tried to subdivide these people of color into various categories.  Mulattos were one half-black and one half-white.  Samboes were black and mulatto (three fourths black and one fourth white).  Quadroons were the offspring of whites and mulattos (three fourths white and one fourth black).  Mestees were the offspring of whites and quadroons (one eight black).  After the Mestees few could perceive a color distinction because it is unlikely that one could detect “black” characteristics if an individual had less than one eighth African ancestry.  Observers also believed that one could detect the differences between the various subdivisions of people of color based on particular qualities, in addition to physical appearance.  The Sambo, although three-fourths black and one fourth white, was still seen differently from the “Negro” in various manners and habits.  Generally, people believed that people of color were less subject to disease than whites or “Negro.”  White observers also firmly adhered to the idea that most people of color felt a distinct advantage and pride in being slightly removed from the “Negro race” and attempted to take on manners and customs of whites. [1]

Regardless of the distinctions that observers made among people of color, they still enjoyed many advances politically.  When James Thome went on a sixth month tour of the island of Jamaica following emancipation, he observed  Harbour Streetthe activity of people of color in various social institutions.  By 1831, free people of color had all of the political offices open to them, and after emancipation they were represented in an array of offices in Kingston.  They were justices of the peace, alderman of the city, justices of the peace, public institution inspectors, and school trustees.   At a local legislature meeting, Thome noticed that there were fifteen members present, and just as many different shades of complexion.  A planter who clearly had aristocratic blood was sitting next to a “deep mulatto,” born in the same parish as a slave.  Yet they all conversed freely as though they were one color, providing a sense of “harmony, confidence and good feeling.” [2]   There were ten colored special magistrates and four colored members of the Assembly at the time of his visit.  However they occupied only one third of the seats in the Assembly, as whites filled the others.  Yet as people of color filled seats, they voted for white alderman and city officers.  Thome observed, “The influential men among them, have always urged them to take up white men, unless they could find competent men of their own color.  As they remarked to us, if they were obliged to send an ass to the Assembly, it was far better for them  to send a white as than a black one.” [3]   Nonetheless, colored people were gradually participating in political and civil bodies on the Island and dividing the legislative and judicial powers with whites.

In a community that is rebuilding, marriage and family are important because those institutions are essential for its growth.  However, few marriages took place among people of color because many females believed that it was more  Native Domestic Servantsreputable to be the kept mistress of a wealthy white man than to marry a “Negro” or another person of color. Beautiful women of color were “fortune-made if they got a place in a white man’s harem.” [4] When females of color were asked why they did not generally intermarry with men of their own class, the typical response was that most brown men were either too poor or indolent to support a wife and children and that as husbands they could be jealous and tyrannical.  Many women also disliked the idea of marriage and viewed it as an unnecessary and unnatural restraint.  Yet numerous females of color found themselves as a “housekeeper” to white men, while men of color found for themselves the comfort of a black woman. [5]

James Stewart, an Englishman who lived for some time in Jamaica, also observed that men of color were divided by society into three classes.  The first was the offspring of men of fortune, who were sent to Great Britain to receive a liberal educated and expected to inherit independent fortunes.  Next came the offspring of men in moderate circumstances, who gave their children a plain education and left the bulk of property among their children at their death.  Finally, there were the men who did not have the means or inclination to provide for their children, which he noted as the most numerous class.  These children lived in idleness and were what Stewart considered a burden to themselves and the community.  Few men of color were elevated above their social stratum by the advantages of fortune and a liberal education and received into the white population. [6]"

Again,"Few men of color were elevated above their social stratum by the advantages of fortune and a liberal education and received into the white population." Hard, harsh facts!

Offline

#10 May 01, 2019 9:42 am

Dancer
Active

Re: Sir Alister McIntyre: Grenadian/Caribbean Scholar Has Passed On

Good post Gripe.
Information , Education , that's what's missing from this TS .

But .... I remember the   deliberate  effort  ,  to run the few that dared  to   express themselves from this TS.
Sad.

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB