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#1 Jul 05, 2019 5:01 am

Calypso
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A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

I've always wondered why Afro-Americans would refer to each other as "[racist word]." I would find it offensive. They would even get rather offensive whenever a white person use that same word. I just finished reading "Banjo" by the Jamaican writer, Claude Mckay. Mr. McKay spent ten years as an expatriate wandering the continent of Europe.  In his novel, "Banjo," the black characters refer to themselves as "Ni@@ers." Why? I am just realizing that it's a way of making peace with their past. You see when a white person calls them that word. it is a representation of terror, hate, violence and inferiority but when they call each other that they are taunting their past  by turning that word into acceptance as a valid member of a race that has been injured.  When they use the word it is no longer negative and they share that understanding. By blocking anyone else from calling them that they are simply saying that despite the historical acrimony that is associated with the word. they've survived the name calling, the lynching, the mob violence. THAT WORD IS A TRUE ACCEPTANCE OF THEIR HISTORY.  I urge you all to read the book.

Last edited by Calypso (Jul 05, 2019 10:27 am)

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#2 Jul 05, 2019 4:26 pm

Expat
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Particularly when talking of Black Americans,  I think it is just ingrained into the culture by repetition from their slave master days. As thankfully those days are long gone, it is simply an indication of low IQ, or poor education, and environment.

I doubt Obama or other elevated Black people like Colin Powell and others walk around spouting My Ngr every time they see a Black person, whereas the youth trying to fit into a deprived environment, and comedians who think they can get some capital about throwing it into a self targetting joke system will.

No it is a crap word, the sooner left in the annals of history the better.

Last edited by Expat (Jul 05, 2019 4:28 pm)

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#3 Jul 05, 2019 4:43 pm

Dancer
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

You had me reading  today , so I will  leave you with something I learned . Will   share  of  Claude McKay's  'Banjo'  later .

> Ni@@er  Heaven  < is a 1926 novel written by a Carl Van Vechten , set during the Harlem Renaissance in the US in the 1920s . The book and its Tittle have been controversial since its publication.
' Ni@@er Heaven '  was a term used in the 19th century to refer to church balconies , which were segregated for African Americans , as the white members of the congregation sat below.

Important period your Harlem Renaissance.

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#4 Jul 05, 2019 7:35 pm

Expat
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

I read "To Kill a Mocking Bird" over many visits to the General Hospital.... I am a slow reader. Plus I went back over some parts to try and get the full intention off the page. Plus I went to sleep waiting to be seen many times.

It was an old school book from the elder Grand Daughter. I guess from around 20 years ago.

It certainly made me feel uncomfortable, and I just couldn't fathom why such a racially edgy book would have been part of a West Indian syllabus.

I did note though that the film had been very faithful to the book.

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#5 Jul 06, 2019 7:06 am

Calypso
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Dancer wrote:

You had me reading  today , so I will  leave you with something I learned . Will   share  of  Claude McKay's  'Banjo'  later .

> Ni@@er  Heaven  < is a 1926 novel written by a Carl Van Vechten , set during the Harlem Renaissance in the US in the 1920s . The book and its Tittle have been controversial since its publication.
' Ni@@er Heaven '  was a term used in the 19th century to refer to church balconies , which were segregated for African Americans , as the white members of the congregation sat below.

Important period your Harlem Renaissance.

I know of "N Heaven" for Mckay mentioned the book in his autobiography Along Way from Home. I will try to read it.

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#6 Jul 06, 2019 7:10 am

Calypso
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Expat wrote:

Particularly when talking of Black Americans,  I think it is just ingrained into the culture by repetition from their slave master days. As thankfully those days are long gone, it is simply an indication of low IQ, or poor education, and environment.

I doubt Obama or other elevated Black people like Colin Powell and others walk around spouting My Ngr every time they see a Black person, whereas the youth trying to fit into a deprived environment, and comedians who think they can get some capital about throwing it into a self targetting joke system will.

No it is a crap word, the sooner left in the annals of history the better.


It could be . I know that even  uneducated blacks in African and Caribbean do not use the word. The lower class in Jamaica would use "Nega" instead and out of anger or sheer sarcasm.. I don't think it's is it's an indication of Low IQ as you stated. I think it's just their way of laughing at their masters.

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#7 Jul 06, 2019 9:25 am

Dancer
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

.. Since I have never spent any time thinking if I was a [racist word] or not , yesterday i did some homework and  >>>>>> that word is true acceptance of their history  <<<<<<  " I can't agree with that conclusion ".
Degrading oneself or others is counter productive  and does more harm than good. Did that acceptance lead to calling your mother or sister , bitch , ho ? That's capitulation not insight.
...  I have seen Richard Wright's  ' The ethics of living Jim Crow ' memoir about life in the South , never read it , but  what I did read yesterday is harrowing and gets no 'insight' from me.

.... ON to Claude McKay's  BANJO.

Speaking of BANJO . I read parts of it in reviews and comments and is leaning towards a review by some Jacqueline Kaye.

Here is  part of what she said  , which struck a cord.

++++ BANJO is a sketch of the black personality by a black writer and it pans across a whole range of blackness.  West African , West Indian , North American and the mulattos of the French West Indians  ,  exploiting their divergences as it seeks to arrive at a common black denominator , the essential negroness , the equivalent of the negritude to be generated by the poetry of the Francophone black .......

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#8 Jul 06, 2019 9:46 am

Calypso
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Dancer wrote:

.. Since I have never spent any time thinking if I was a [racist word] or not , yesterday i did some homework and  >>>>>> that word is true acceptance of their history  <<<<<<  " I can't agree with that conclusion ".
Degrading oneself or others is counter productive  and does more harm than good. Did that acceptance lead to calling your mother or sister , bitch , ho ? That's capitulation not insight.
...  I have seen Richard Wright's  ' The ethics of living Jim Crow ' memoir about life in the South , never read it , but  what I did read yesterday is harrowing and gets no 'insight' from me.

.... ON to Claude McKay's  BANJO.

Speaking of BANJO . I read parts of it in reviews and comments and is leaning towards a review by some Jacqueline Kaye.

Here is  part of what she said  , which struck a cord.

++++ BANJO is a sketch of the black personality by a black writer and it pans across a whole range of blackness.  West African , West Indian , North American and the mulattos of the French West Indians  ,  exploiting their divergences as it seeks to arrive at a common black denominator , the essential negroness , the equivalent of the negritude to be generated by the poetry of the Francophone black .......

Bull crap!! When Banjo came out It was glorified by the  founders  of the "Negritude" movement. The novel depicts how working-class blacks lived and behaved. Why should they put on airs and grace for the white audience? When a black person calls another black person the N word it doesn't not have a negative connotation. One of my six graders referred to one of his classmates as a "chocolate Ni@@er" this year. At first I was appalled but after reflecting I realized that it is generational. It is a class thing and it's a part of their history. If a white student had called the black student that it would have been unaccepted!

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#9 Jul 06, 2019 10:03 am

Dancer
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

From my perspective it has zero to do with 'putting on airs' . And why do you  want people to define how you think of yourself . Ha " when  some black people call other black people [racist word] , why do they want to fight.
I wonder if in a court of law that provocation could be deemed justified.

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#10 Jul 06, 2019 10:16 am

Calypso
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Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Dancer wrote:

From my perspective it has zero to do with 'putting on airs' . And why do you  want people to define how you think of yourself . Ha " when  some black people call other black people [racist word] , why do they want to fight.
I wonder if in a court of law that provocation could be deemed justified.


It is how it is done that initiates the fight. When they normally use that word it is done so casually. There's not emotional intensity it in.

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