You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the one and only Spiceislander Talkshop.

#11 Jul 06, 2019 10:58 am

Dancer
Active

Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Let's not stray from the meaning of the word ::: a contemptuous term for a black or dark skinned person.
The word now ranks as almost certainly the most offensive and inflammatory racial slur in English, a term expressive of hatred and bigotry. >> Merriam Webster Dictionary

USA.... Hate speech  and 1st  Amendment ...... say what you want.
Canada ..... Restrictions are justifiable under Canadian charter Of Rights and freedoms.

Urban Dictionary  -----
A word that offends blacks , but should only offend blacks that fit  the description of it.
The reason why no - [racist word] blacks get offended is because they hate to be associated  with their race 'bad apples' not because of whatever slavery - related nonsense that other people confuse it with  ------- just how non-red necks ' whites  , hate to be called such.
Everyone ( including whites) can agree that there is a huge difference between 'blacks' and 'niggers'.

Offline

#12 Jul 06, 2019 11:06 am

Calypso
Active

Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Dancer wrote:

Let's not stray from the meaning of the word ::: a contemptuous term for a black or dark skinned person.
The word now ranks as almost certainly the most offensive and inflammatory racial slur in English, a term expressive of hatred and bigotry. >> Merriam Webster Dictionary

USA.... Hate speech  and 1st  Amendment ...... say what you want.
Canada ..... Restrictions are justifiable under Canadian charter Of Rights and freedoms.

Urban Dictionary  -----
A word that offends blacks , but should only offend blacks that fit  the description of it.
The reason why no - [racist word] blacks get offended is because they hate to be associated  with their race 'bad apples' not because of whatever slavery - related nonsense that other people confuse it with  ------- just how non-red necks ' whites  , hate to be called such.
Everyone ( including whites) can agree that there is a huge difference between 'blacks' and 'niggers'.

You have strayed completely from the topic,Sir. It's a colloquial term among lower-class blacks that they do not find offensive among each other and should not be interpreted as such by anyone.

Offline

#13 Jul 06, 2019 11:47 pm

Expat
Active

Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Calypso wrote:
Dancer wrote:

From my perspective it has zero to do with 'putting on airs' . And why do you  want people to define how you think of yourself . Ha " when  some black people call other black people [racist word] , why do they want to fight.
I wonder if in a court of law that provocation could be deemed justified.


It is how it is done that initiates the fight. When they normally use that word it is done so casually. There's not emotional intensity it in.

Just as one of our posters said in person recently. He has a white colleague/friend who would call him my N word and it had no side to it, and was an indication of a deeper friendship of many years standing.

While I stand ready to be corrected by NH, our resident expert on ancient life in England, I tend to think the N word was not a common term either against Blacks or by Blacks in the UK until Americanisation of movie material made it trendy. There were other unpleasant words, which I don't think is necessary to catalogue, but the N word as such was not top of the list, although I admit I was called a N lover by some idiot kid on the estate where I used to live in the 70's.

I think N word is more American just as Kaffer is South African.

Offline

#14 Jul 07, 2019 5:33 am

Calypso
Active

Re: A New Insight on Using the Word "NI@@ER"

Expat wrote:
Calypso wrote:
Dancer wrote:

From my perspective it has zero to do with 'putting on airs' . And why do you  want people to define how you think of yourself . Ha " when  some black people call other black people [racist word] , why do they want to fight.
I wonder if in a court of law that provocation could be deemed justified.


It is how it is done that initiates the fight. When they normally use that word it is done so casually. There's not emotional intensity it in.

Just as one of our posters said in person recently. He has a white colleague/friend who would call him my N word and it had no side to it, and was an indication of a deeper friendship of many years standing.

While I stand ready to be corrected by NH, our resident expert on ancient life in England, I tend to think the N word was not a common term either against Blacks or by Blacks in the UK until Americanisation of movie material made it trendy. There were other unpleasant words, which I don't think is necessary to catalogue, but the N word as such was not top of the list, although I admit I was called a N lover by some idiot kid on the estate where I used to live in the 70's.

I think N word is more American just as Kaffer is South African.


I am sure they called Jean Rhys a N lover too being a white West Indian who lived mostly around blacks. I have noticed that when American blacks use it to each other it's not offensive. When I finished reading Banjo by Claude Mckay. That's  how the characters called each other--the same way as the whites did in the south. I interpret  it as coming in terms with themselves and their history.

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB