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#11 Jun 02, 2020 6:11 pm

houston
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Re: Hog slaughter

New Historian wrote:

Pigs are very smart (except the one in the WH currently); and they have a sixth sense that tells them, when the end of their world is nigh. I've seen a man just take out his blade and look at the pig, and the thing started to bellow and scream like his life depended on it! Which it did. And it didn't do the pig any good in the end...

Several years ago I worked in a building in downtown Toronto (Hog Town) as it known. Just down the street was the oldest pork slaughter house in the province and the odor could be bad on a hot humid day or depending on the direction of the wind.
When I first started I wondered about that screeching sound every time a transport truck turned the corner to go down the narrow road, thinking the brakes needed some service.
The slo learner then suddenly realized it was the sound of pigs squealing..soon as they rounded the corner, they could smell the scent of death up the road.
That area was quickly building up at the time. Always felt bad for the new condo owners with a balcony on the wrong side of the wind.

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#12 Jun 02, 2020 7:20 pm

Expat
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Re: Hog slaughter

When I heard pigs would not go through the normal process I was prepared for indifference to suffering, I have seen it before. Totally reprehensible, whether Covid or Mad Cow disease what ever.

But doing to those pigs what we would scream about if it happened to a child or pet in a car. Damn.

Like RD said put em out with C02. Even sledging em is pretty miserable when you are talking about walking along and braining the animal. Mistakes, and pain is likely to be an outcome in that kind of volume. Dealing with one or two animals. OK it may look awful, but it is probably pretty instant one on one. But hundreds on the trot?

Surely even a .22 would do it, or that same stun gun. So walk em out, and cap em and haul em off with a tractor to the truck for the pit. Not so quick for the owners, but a hell of a lot quicker for that very intelligent animal.

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#13 Jun 02, 2020 9:29 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Hog slaughter

In my younger days I was an avid hunter.  I have killed, butchered and eaten may animals.  That said, I found that video to be quite disturbing.  Dammit.

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#14 Jun 02, 2020 10:53 pm

Expat
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Re: Hog slaughter

Yep, not against hunting. Only hunters that have a greater opinion of their abilities than they really have.

A lousy shot or arrow strike means a lousy death.

It was rather upsetting when on that trip to Isle de Rhonde spoken about the other day some of our company thought it was OK to shoot at Sea Birds wheeling over the water. No hits were made, which was not a surprise, but had one been nicked it could have flopped into the water far away from us and died slowly. That was with air guns, and then potting away at ducks with a .22 rim-fire on a pond that we probably could never have been able to reach.

Just hunters bravado.

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#15 Jun 02, 2020 11:14 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Hog slaughter

I have gotten too tender hearted to enjoy hunting in my dotage.

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#16 Jun 03, 2020 9:27 am

Slice
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Re: Hog slaughter

Last year while in Grenada, ah was around the abator and I saw the way the handled the animals, that was about to be slaughtered, and ah was praying that the animals rights group was not in Grenada.

If it is ah pet, ah have feeling for them, but if they are about to be killed and eaten, me ent care one little bit.  How they get killed doh matter to me.
Having said that, growing up we had a number of chickens.  I think ah hen, we use to call Crayfish tail, was killed for  a Sunday dinner one day.  Up to this day, ah still cant forget poor Crayfish tail, she was such ah sweet chicken.

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#17 Jun 03, 2020 3:08 pm

Expat
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Re: Hog slaughter

Slice wrote:

Last year while in Grenada, ah was around the abator and I saw the way the handled the animals, that was about to be slaughtered, and ah was praying that the animals rights group was not in Grenada.

If it is ah pet, ah have feeling for them, but if they are about to be killed and eaten, me ent care one little bit.  How they get killed doh matter to me.
Having said that, growing up we had a number of chickens.  I think ah hen, we use to call Crayfish tail, was killed for  a Sunday dinner one day.  Up to this day, ah still cant forget poor Crayfish tail, she was such ah sweet chicken.

So you acknowledge even the "professionals" in Grenada are untrained cruel butchers in the true sense of the word.

An animal MAY be a commodity by virtue of being in the food chain, but until it is an inert slab of meat it should be treated with what we laughingly call humanity/respect.

Animals generally seem to know when the sand has run out. Certainly, a cock that has strutted around without a care in the world which will saunter past me as if we are old buddies etc,  will get very skittish the moment it sees my rifle come out.

But most animals Beef or Pork can smell the blood, and sense the fear, and to do anything other than stun them, and dispatch them cleanly is just wrong. There are studies out there indicating how to control the flow of the animals without inducing stress.

The way you all prod around inside with a long thin blade to kill pigs makes my skin crawl. Shoot it, sledge it if necessary, and hook it up and drain it.

I saw footage off the government website showing chicken intensive farming, which looked as if it was in Grenada. The farm managers, and the Ministry of Agriculture inspectors should be hung drawn and quartered for the conditions those birds were in.

I do not agree with modern intensive egg laying farms, they have the animals restricted way too much, but those birds in Grenada were shoulder to shoulder like a carpet of feathers on the ground. Thy did not look well, and then off to the slaughter hooked up on a conveyor. I am not bitching about the conveyor, but from the previous filming I dread to think how efficient the decapitation was.

We see horrendous conditions for animals from around the world, and I am sure Grenada is not the worst. But just from your own professed indifference to what happens to them, it is indicative as to how little Grenadians in general think about, care about or individually treat livestock.

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#18 Jun 03, 2020 4:19 pm

houston
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Re: Hog slaughter

Poultry farms can be real bad. Conveyors of hatchlings that get sexed. Males are slammed down to the floor..no eggs from that one.
Ever stare at a cow? Those eyes are blank, as if they know thier destiny. They play stupid and show no emotion as though they know their role in life. Passing by beef trailers on the road and looking at those big sad eyes is no different than seeing them graze in a field.
Not a peep from them. They seem to accept their fate.

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#19 Jun 03, 2020 5:25 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Hog slaughter

houston wrote:

Poultry farms can be real bad. Conveyors of hatchlings that get sexed. Males are slammed down to the floor..no eggs from that one.
Ever stare at a cow? Those eyes are blank, as if they know thier destiny. They play stupid and show no emotion as though they know their role in life. Passing by beef trailers on the road and looking at those big sad eyes is no different than seeing them graze in a field.
Not a peep from them. They seem to accept their fate.

I get around 50% males, so thats a lot of slamming.

I think I have seen where they split off the hens from the cocks...... neither treated very gently, and then the males disappear down a chute which ends up in a crusher.

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