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#1 Jul 16, 2020 4:07 pm

New Historian
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Africa chronicles again

I'm sure that my story stalker will point out my fast diminishing grey matter by saying I've put this one here already, but I'm bored so here goes:

Thursday, 6 June 2002
Asmara – Djibuti – Nairobi

Yesterday, there was one helluva sandstorm; the locals call it “taka". It's the same dust I saw the previous day in Khartoum and is very unusual at this time of the year. It means that rain, a precious commodity up here, is coming, so people bear it in good spirits. Clogs up your nose, chokes the throat, covers everything in a fine red dust. By the end of the day I was gagging; had to imbibe liquids to keep moist.

Eritreans are a good looking people. Thin noses, curly locks and fine features. And pretty women. About half the population are Muslim, and the women saunter round town, swathed in several layers of muslin robes (Muslims in muslin?). Very slow, unhurried. People stroll slowly across the road; and the cars patiently wait for them to cross. The entire town dies for long, leisurely lunches, and probably a little siesta afterwards too. Eritrea is the last country on earth without cellphones (“Eritrea: The Final Frontier”).

Leaving Asmara had a slight problem, and had to rush to the Immigration Office, to get some magic piece of paper, before heading to the airport. Made it ok though. Just before we landed in Nairo, I realised that the jet-black man sitting directly behind me, who had been loudly chatting to his mate the whole flight about “secession”, was John Garang, leader of the Sudanese People's Liberation Army. A quick check on the net reveals:

Human Rights Watch/Africa reported that the SPLA was guilty of, amongst other things, summary executions, indiscriminate attacks on civilians, the deliberate starvation of civilians, abducting civilians, mainly women and children, torture, forced recruitment and forced labour, theft of civilian animals, food and grain, and the holding of long-term political prisoners in prolonged arbitrary detention and THE SHOOTING DOWN OF CIVILIAN AIRLINERS, incidents involving considerable loss of civilian life.

Good thing no one decided to put a SAM-7 missile up his arse on that particular flight.  He got off in Nairobi, met by an official car.

PS: John Garang died in 2005, in yes you guessed it, a helicopter crash. Seems he had become politically surplus to requirements.

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#2 Jul 16, 2020 4:22 pm

Calypso
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Re: Africa chronicles again

NH, would you go  Mali now. I want to take a trip there. Have you been there?

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#3 Jul 16, 2020 4:33 pm

Slice
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Re: Africa chronicles again

There is ah little paper up here called the Afro-American, boy they could use your talents.  I think it is over ah hundred years old. It is little, but very historic.

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#4 Jul 16, 2020 4:40 pm

New Historian
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Re: Africa chronicles again

Calypso wrote:

NH, would you go  Mali now. I want to take a trip there. Have you been there?

Went once, wouldn't rush back there now with all the Boko Haram foolishness. Bamako is dusty and very hot and no one speaks English. The "only" place to go in Mali is Timbuktu, but it's hard, hot and very expensive. I didn't make that trip. At Bamako Airport I couldn't even find a T-shirt to buy, they're missing a trick there. The trick they did have though, was a goody. The one "souvenir" shop in departures was selling these little statuettes, of some guy with a spear, but when the purchasers got to the door of the plane, all the souvenirs were confiscated, for having sharp points!! A good little racket!

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#5 Jul 17, 2020 12:26 am

Expat
Active

Re: Africa chronicles again

New Historian wrote:

I'm sure that my story stalker will point out my fast diminishing grey matter by saying I've put this one here already, but I'm bored so here goes:

Thursday, 6 June 2002
Asmara – Djibuti – Nairobi

Yesterday, there was one helluva sandstorm; the locals call it “taka". It's the same dust I saw the previous day in Khartoum and is very unusual at this time of the year. It means that rain, a precious commodity up here, is coming, so people bear it in good spirits. Clogs up your nose, chokes the throat, covers everything in a fine red dust. By the end of the day I was gagging; had to imbibe liquids to keep moist.

Eritreans are a good looking people. Thin noses, curly locks and fine features. And pretty women. About half the population are Muslim, and the women saunter round town, swathed in several layers of muslin robes (Muslims in muslin?). Very slow, unhurried. People stroll slowly across the road; and the cars patiently wait for them to cross. The entire town dies for long, leisurely lunches, and probably a little siesta afterwards too. Eritrea is the last country on earth without cellphones (“Eritrea: The Final Frontier”).

Leaving Asmara had a slight problem, and had to rush to the Immigration Office, to get some magic piece of paper, before heading to the airport. Made it ok though. Just before we landed in Nairo, I realised that the jet-black man sitting directly behind me, who had been loudly chatting to his mate the whole flight about “secession”, was John Garang, leader of the Sudanese People's Liberation Army. A quick check on the net reveals:

Human Rights Watch/Africa reported that the SPLA was guilty of, amongst other things, summary executions, indiscriminate attacks on civilians, the deliberate starvation of civilians, abducting civilians, mainly women and children, torture, forced recruitment and forced labour, theft of civilian animals, food and grain, and the holding of long-term political prisoners in prolonged arbitrary detention and THE SHOOTING DOWN OF CIVILIAN AIRLINERS, incidents involving considerable loss of civilian life.

Good thing no one decided to put a SAM-7 missile up his arse on that particular flight.  He got off in Nairobi, met by an official car.

PS: John Garang died in 2005, in yes you guessed it, a helicopter crash. Seems he had become politically surplus to requirements.


Getting silly now.  A stalker is one who look for, searches out and follows. What you render is dropped in our laps to be viewed. I don't think you posted this last piece before, but then I don't stalk your writings, so maybe I missed one of the potentially 20 times it might have been posted before?  Who knows.

While there is a ? growing audience, or changing audience, there may be several people who have not seen some of the stories before, and I don't think anyone is not going to say they are good stories. So for those new readers, they will be interesting and amusing. But I don't think you should be vexed when old heads note the stew has been reheated. The flip side I would have thought, is that people have read your stories in enough depth to remember facets of them. No?

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#6 Jul 17, 2020 7:13 am

Calypso
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Re: Africa chronicles again

"Eritreans are a good looking people. Thin noses, curly locks and fine features"

What are you saying that people from West Africa are ugly because they do not have these features? Mental slavery. After hundreds of years slavery, people of color still say these fucking ignorant things!

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#7 Jul 17, 2020 8:25 am

New Historian
Active

Re: Africa chronicles again

"But I don't think you should be vexed when old heads note the stew has been reheated. The flip side I would have thought, is that people have read your stories in enough depth to remember facets of them. No?"

Not vex at all me old son, just one of those many times that our mere words aren't thick enough, to convey our full feelings. Ta.

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#8 Jul 17, 2020 8:29 am

New Historian
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Re: Africa chronicles again

Calypso wrote:

"Eritreans are a good looking people. Thin noses, curly locks and fine features"

What are you saying that people from West Africa are ugly because they do not have these features? Mental slavery. After hundreds of years slavery, people of color still say these fucking ignorant things!


Point taken, but not meant. Those are two separate sentences, not one flowing from the other. I admit I was thinking of the women when I wrote it lol! Nigerians (ie women!) are also very good looking people - I don't know about men being good looking lol!

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#9 Jul 17, 2020 11:52 am

Expat
Active

Re: Africa chronicles again

Somewhere on social media there is a photo going round of the Blackest Woman recorded in the Guinness book of Records. Definitely an attractive eyeful. A Sudanese Model. I guess being next door to Eritrea might mean some shared genes. None of those nasty Nigerian genes...   smile

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#10 Jul 17, 2020 12:12 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Africa chronicles again

Expat wrote:

Somewhere on social media there is a photo going round of the Blackest Woman recorded in the Guinness book of Records. Definitely an attractive eyeful. A Sudanese Model. I guess being next door to Eritrea might mean some shared genes. None of those nasty Nigerian genes...   smile

Doh be dissin' my Naija peeps-oh! Dem Nigerian women does have some fiiine genes alright, beautiful! Zimbabwe not so much, dem woman fell outta de ugly tree! Of course Calypso's gonna lash me for being such a degenerate, I feel sorry for the lady really, living on faded glory is a be-atch!! smile

Who have the best lookin' women in the Caribbean? Boy I'd say Trini - closely followed by JA!!

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