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#1 Sep 20, 2020 5:30 pm

houston
Active

Beach gone

Up until about 2 years ago this shoreline had about 30 yards of sand between the banks and the water. These days it's a losing battle of trying to prevent the shore erosion with boulders put in place.
The washed away sand finds its way to Lake Erie. The shalowest of the Great Lakes and becoming more shallow and polluted by the day. Soon to become a giant puddle, a spilling wetland area.
This is the result of northern melt. It's to be expected over time but it's the rate of how quickly it is happening that is alarming.
That is water that eventually makes its way to the oceans. Maybe not noticable on a larger body of water but you can certainly see the increase on the Great Lakes.


622322531.jpg

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#2 Sep 20, 2020 5:40 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

Just last summer this tree was about 60 feet from the water.


622323101.jpg

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#3 Sep 20, 2020 6:25 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: Beach gone

That's pretty stark. No doubt the apologists will have some "scientific" alter-explanation.

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#4 Sep 20, 2020 7:24 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

A paltry 12,000 years ago the Great Lakes didn't even exist.  Lake levels have been changing since they were created during the last glaciation due to 'isostatic rebound."  The weight of the ice pushed down the crust of the earth and it is still rebounding.  Seriously.  Look it up.

That is just one of the reasons the lakes are constantly changing.  Sure, human caused climate change is probably one of the many reasons but if you think the lakes would be static and unchanging in the absence of human civilization, you are seriously uninformed.

Even then, Lake Erie had higher water levels 30 years ago than it has today.  It was as high in 1860 as it is now.

18602016_2_5range(5).jpg

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#5 Sep 20, 2020 7:50 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

I have lived around the Great Lakes all of my life and have never seen the erosion along the shores of Huron as fast as it's happening now. Yes, high and low water seasons have been taking place for years, but not a constant erosion like this.
Would you go for a swim in Lake Erie or dare to eat a prized Yellow Perch from that lake?

https://environmentaldefence.ca/2020/07 … cast-2020/

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#6 Sep 20, 2020 8:30 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

Are you sure the beaches as you knew them are the correct state of affairs?  Why was the way you remember it 'correct' and the way it is now 'wrong"?

Also, how do you explain these rapid increases in lake levels shown in the arrows?   They are much larger and faster increases than we are experiencing now and they were back in the good ol' days.



Opera-Snapshot-2020-09-20-192553-www-glisaclimate-org.png

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#7 Sep 20, 2020 9:22 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

Do you have a graph that shows the depth of the lake over area?
Do you have an explanation as to where all of that sand from Lake Huron goes?
Do you believe that the depth of Lake Erie remains a constant ebb and flow for ever?

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#8 Sep 20, 2020 11:35 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

Again, the Great Lakes were created during the last glaciation.  It was just a blink of an eye in geologic history. Modern homo sapiens had migrated to every continent by then.  The lakes didn't even exist before then.  They are practically brand new lakes.  The cave paintings in France, for example, were painted many thousands of years before Lake Erie existed.

If the lakes are new phenomena, there is no reason to expect them to be stable.

This painting predates the existence of Lake Erie by about 25,000 years. 

Cave-Painting-Feature.jpg

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#9 Sep 21, 2020 9:46 am

Expat
Active

Re: Beach gone

houston wrote:

Up until about 2 years ago this shoreline had about 30 yards of sand between the banks and the water. These days it's a losing battle of trying to prevent the shore erosion with boulders put in place.
The washed away sand finds its way to Lake Erie. The shalowest of the Great Lakes and becoming more shallow and polluted by the day. Soon to become a giant puddle, a spilling wetland area.
This is the result of northern melt. It's to be expected over time but it's the rate of how quickly it is happening that is alarming.
That is water that eventually makes its way to the oceans. Maybe not noticable on a larger body of water but you can certainly see the increase on the Great Lakes.


https://i.postimg.cc/V5DVg01p/622322531.jpg

I know RD has his teeth into your groin, so I don't want to make him twist his head, but after watching the back and forth, a tiny little thought occured to me.

You are talking about erosion, Although you do mention ice melt, RD is principally talking about rise and fall of water levels.

You can have your erosion without any rise in water level. It only takes a few storms and your beach is gone. Just as our western beaches were scoured by hurricanes, and then the sand is slowly redeposited by natural wave patterns.

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#10 Sep 21, 2020 9:48 am

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

The sand isn't gone.  With a change in currents, it will be washed up and a beach will be born.  They come and they go.

In any case, I don't accept the premise that there is supposed to be a beach there in the first place.  A beach or a rocky shore?  Which is correct?  Neither.  Both.  It is a nonsensical question.

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