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#11 Dec 17, 2020 11:38 pm

New Historian
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Re: When staying awake means staying alive

And we think we've got it hard.

Cape-Horn.png

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#12 Dec 18, 2020 12:00 pm

Expat
Active

Re: When staying awake means staying alive

When I get it hard it don't look like that... wink

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#13 Dec 18, 2020 6:32 pm

New Historian
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Re: When staying awake means staying alive

Boom!

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#14 Dec 18, 2020 6:45 pm

houston
Active

Re: When staying awake means staying alive

New Historian wrote:
houston wrote:

Got wondering recently about sailing ships during the earlier centuries. Some ships would have a crew of up to 180 men and be away for months or years.
How did they stay warm in places like the St. Lawrence River in November? What did they eat, where did they sleep?
That led to the question, where did they do their business?
Of course the head. The bow of the ship was a netted or planked area open to the sea below.  Ropes were dragged along in the water and hauled up for an arse wipe. It was a not a pretty life.
No wonder so many died of disease or malnutrition.
Interesting to read about those unimaginable times.

Not the bow (front), the stern (rear - pun intended!). I'm a history nerd when it comes to old sailing ships and the men that sailed in them. A hard life for true. A fascinating look at the last of the clipper ships, rounding the feared Cape Horn. Enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tuTKhqWZso

I believe the stern loo was reserved for the captain and a few of the upper ranks. The main can for the crew was located at the bow so that the waves could splash through and wash it up.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_(watercraft)

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#15 Dec 18, 2020 6:59 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: When staying awake means staying alive

houston wrote:
New Historian wrote:
houston wrote:

Got wondering recently about sailing ships during the earlier centuries. Some ships would have a crew of up to 180 men and be away for months or years.
How did they stay warm in places like the St. Lawrence River in November? What did they eat, where did they sleep?
That led to the question, where did they do their business?
Of course the head. The bow of the ship was a netted or planked area open to the sea below.  Ropes were dragged along in the water and hauled up for an arse wipe. It was a not a pretty life.
No wonder so many died of disease or malnutrition.
Interesting to read about those unimaginable times.

Not the bow (front), the stern (rear - pun intended!). I'm a history nerd when it comes to old sailing ships and the men that sailed in them. A hard life for true. A fascinating look at the last of the clipper ships, rounding the feared Cape Horn. Enjoy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tuTKhqWZso

I believe the stern loo was reserved for the captain and a few of the upper ranks. The main can for the crew was located at the bow so that the waves could splash through and wash it up.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_(watercraft)

Thank you sir, didn't know that. Can be dangerous, you wouldn't want a big wave come and send that "stuff" splashing down the whole length of the boat lol!!

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#16 Dec 18, 2020 7:43 pm

houston
Active

Re: When staying awake means staying alive

Swabbing the deck was an important job.

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