You are not logged in.

Announcement

Welcome to the Spiceislander Talkshop. We have a new look and new features. Have a look around. The site remains Grenadian owned and hosted in the United States.

#1 Jul 11, 2017 9:36 pm

New Historian
Member

Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

We’re good at talking about integration – endlessly. But, when it comes to actually doing integration, national self-interest always wins out in the end. The best integration is the OECS: 8 islands that are within sight of each other, are similar to each other, and are usually related to each other. But the wider we cast the Caribbean net, the less it catch.

When I travel to St Kitts, they stamp in my passport: “Leave to stay: indefinitely”. This is true integration. But when I land in Trinidad; I get a million questions. This isn’t integration; it’s interrogation. West Indians know Miami more than they know the West Indies; there’s almost zero coordination on key economic issues like taxation, fiscal incentives and trade.

Investors play one island off against the other. “Oh, so you won’t give me this? Well, they sure will!” And we fall for it, every time. In the Caribbean, this is known as a crab in a barrel mentality: let’s pull each one down, rather than pull each one up.

So instead of creating one single, large-ish Caribbean market, with one set of rules, we fight among ourselves at the global table, squabbling over the limited pool of investment dollars, tourist dollars, and development dollars. Our record in the creation one unified, coordinated Caribbean can be summed up in one word: underwhelming.

Offline

#2 Jul 12, 2017 10:09 am

Slice
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

Doh matter how many times ah go to Trinidad it is always harder than entering America.  Here is the difference, my wife me son and meself landing in Grenada late December last year, once I said they are me family, there was not a single question asked.

Me father-in-law visited me in Grenada once from Trinidad, they would not let him in the island, until I came and spoke to them.  He did not know where we were staying.

The Caribbean will never ever be united.  Just like Africa. But in the Caribbean they are talking, not the same in Africa.

Offline

#3 Jul 12, 2017 8:21 pm

Expat
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

Slice wrote:

Doh matter how many times ah go to Trinidad it is always harder than entering America.  Here is the difference, my wife me son and meself landing in Grenada late December last year, once I said they are me family, there was not a single question asked.

Me father-in-law visited me in Grenada once from Trinidad, they would not let him in the island, until I came and spoke to them.  He did not know where we were staying.

The Caribbean will never ever be united.  Just like Africa. But in the Caribbean they are talking, not the same in Africa.


Well, don't blame immigration for your father in laws lack of knowledge. There were just dong there job.... if you don't know where you are going you are sadly unaware of what you are about.

I may allow others to state racial profiling with this next comment, but as a Grenadian Citizen some years ago I went to T&T with my wife and parents, ALL of whom had British passports.

I went through the Caricom line leaving them behind in a long line of Visitors...  My passport was stamped 6 months with very few questions. I then asked, can my family on British Passports come through this way, as there are no other Caricom passengers... Sure... so said so done... and a 6 months stamp on their passports too.

Offline

#4 Jul 12, 2017 8:58 pm

New Historian
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

And such royal treatment had NOTHING to do with the fact that you're white and clearly British-Grenadian? Trust me, "ordinary" (ie black) Grenadians entering Trinidad NEVER get asked "few questions" - it's interrogation time! Frikkin Bim too.

Offline

#5 Jul 13, 2017 8:54 am

Expat
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

New Historian wrote:

And such royal treatment had NOTHING to do with the fact that you're white and clearly British-Grenadian? Trust me, "ordinary" (ie black) Grenadians entering Trinidad NEVER get asked "few questions" - it's interrogation time! Frikkin Bim too.


Not inclined to argue, I just thought I would share, so you could comment further on Caribbean integration etc.

I don't know for Barbados, I suspect they are just bloody minded due to Grenada having MBIA and not having to overnight at their rip off B&B where you don't get breakfast as they don't provide it as you HAVE to leave for the airport.

Although we know that Grenadians have been intertwined with Trinidads development, there is also a strong potential for over staying.... isn't there?  So Immigration officers are more likely to be more inquisitive.... I see the same behaviour on TV programs about Customs and Immigration officers across the globe.

I suspect our ease of entry would have been assisted by the implied understanding that we WERE obviously temporary visitors, and were going to stay at a well known location. Rather than "going by my cousin in Diego Martin" or "Toco", and then disappear into Lavantille.

Offline

#6 Jul 13, 2017 9:14 am

New Historian
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

"I suspect our ease of entry would have been assisted by the implied understanding that we WERE obviously temporary visitors, and were going to stay at a well known location. Rather than "going by my cousin in Diego Martin" or "Toco", and then disappear into Lavantille."

When I fill in "Hilton" for place of stay, does that stop the interrogation? Nope. But point made about these types of people the world over: give a person a uniform, and immediately they turn into an a-hole!

Offline

#7 Jul 13, 2017 11:21 am

Slice
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

New Historian wrote:

And such royal treatment had NOTHING to do with the fact that you're white and clearly British-Grenadian? Trust me, "ordinary" (ie black) Grenadians entering Trinidad NEVER get asked "few questions" - it's interrogation time! Frikkin Bim too.

You took those words from me mouth.

This is very strange, but in Grenada, ah experience more Racial discrimination, than in America.  Especially them Fancy restaurants.

Wifee and I wanted to have dinner at Grenada Beach resorts.  We sat for for more than 30 minutes and not ah soul came back to us.  White folks was seated promptly.

Ah doh like to complain, but folks might be shocked the way some black folks are treated as compared to white folks in the Caribbean.

Last edited by Slice (Jul 13, 2017 11:24 am)

Offline

#8 Jul 13, 2017 6:59 pm

Expat
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

New Historian wrote:

"I suspect our ease of entry would have been assisted by the implied understanding that we WERE obviously temporary visitors, and were going to stay at a well known location. Rather than "going by my cousin in Diego Martin" or "Toco", and then disappear into Lavantille."

When I fill in "Hilton" for place of stay, does that stop the interrogation? Nope. But point made about these types of people the world over: give a person a uniform, and immediately they turn into an a-hole!


Aaahhh you came up short. You should have said upside down Hilton, and then they would have known you were the real deal.... smile

Offline

#9 Jul 14, 2017 10:29 am

New Historian
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

"Aaahhh you came up short. You should have said upside down Hilton, and then they would have known you were the real deal.... "

True lol!!

Offline

#10 Jul 15, 2017 9:25 am

Slice
Member

Re: Our abysmal record on Caribbean integration

Excuse me, but I ent getting the upside Down Hilton thing.  Sorry I should of said Spice Island Beach resort.

Expat you know uniforms are the lower class in America, if there is such ah thing.  Suits are what is noticed.

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB