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#1 Aug 23, 2018 11:42 am

New Historian
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Zen and the art of starting a Triumph motorcycle

The British motorcycle industry of the 1960s held the philosophy that pain and discomfort are life’s highest virtues, and that only the most virtuous of men should be allowed to ride their venerated Triumphs. Minor matters like comfort and practicality were meant for wimpy foreigners. So Triumph’s designers came up with a devious series of obstacles designed to test your mettle, your capacity to absorb pain and frustration. Commencing with just starting the bastard.

For the uninitiated, all you’d get when you stomped down on that kick-starter would be a cough, a splutter and a wheeze; as the bike would sit there, unmoved. You’d try again, with the same result. And again. And again. By which time the carburetor would be flooded, and the best thing you could do would be to go off and cool down before frustration led you to kick the effin’ bike over in a screaming fit. Why wouldn’t the bugger start? Because you hadn’t approached it right. You hadn’t gotten into the right frame of mind. You had to know the little secrets of kick-starting a Triumph. The right rituals. The right Zen.

The biggest mistake you could make in trying to kick-start a Triumph is to attack it with brute force - wrong. Without applying the right technique, all the brute force in the world wouldn’t get her fired up. Sounds familiar?

Before trying to kick-start the engine, first you had to tickle the tickler. No the tickler isn’t some exotic sex toy, the tickler is a peculiar feature of the Amal Mark 1 carburetor, fitted on all Triumph motorcycles of the 1960s. After turning on the gas tank you had to press a little button on the side of the carburetor a couple of times, to prime the pump, so when you kicked the starter the petrol would already be in the carburetor and wouldn’t have to be sucked in from the tank, which would take a couple of extra kicks.

Of course you had to be careful not to tickle the tickler too much, because that would flood the engine, which then wouldn’t start for at least five minutes no matter how many times you kicked it. So assuming you’ve tickled the tickler just enough, now comes the actual kick, the one that (purportedly) starts the engine. In fact you could say that firing up a Triumph is a thoroughly satisfying experience.

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#2 Aug 23, 2018 5:07 pm

Dancer
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Re: Zen and the art of starting a Triumph motorcycle

WebMaster     .... are you sure  ,  the line has not been crossed  .... by `` How to start an old  Triumph . By New Historian  .

sad. . lol.

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#3 Aug 25, 2018 11:00 am

Dancer
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Re: Zen and the art of starting a Triumph motorcycle

After New Historian laid down one of his best ramblings .  He is dumb.
Dazzled by  a hole in one  , never intended  ....
Or ...Hey ! New Historian  not too bad .... or lucky .
Don`t be shy New Historian ... admit you  lucked in .
Shying away ....lol



..... a classy one .

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#4 Aug 25, 2018 6:51 pm

Expat
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Re: Zen and the art of starting a Triumph motorcycle

New Historian wrote:

The British motorcycle industry of the 1960s held the philosophy that pain and discomfort are life’s highest virtues, and that only the most virtuous of men should be allowed to ride their venerated Triumphs. Minor matters like comfort and practicality were meant for wimpy foreigners. So Triumph’s designers came up with a devious series of obstacles designed to test your mettle, your capacity to absorb pain and frustration. Commencing with just starting the bastard.

For the uninitiated, all you’d get when you stomped down on that kick-starter would be a cough, a splutter and a wheeze; as the bike would sit there, unmoved. You’d try again, with the same result. And again. And again. By which time the carburetor would be flooded, and the best thing you could do would be to go off and cool down before frustration led you to kick the effin’ bike over in a screaming fit. Why wouldn’t the bugger start? Because you hadn’t approached it right. You hadn’t gotten into the right frame of mind. You had to know the little secrets of kick-starting a Triumph. The right rituals. The right Zen.

The biggest mistake you could make in trying to kick-start a Triumph is to attack it with brute force - wrong. Without applying the right technique, all the brute force in the world wouldn’t get her fired up. Sounds familiar?

Before trying to kick-start the engine, first you had to tickle the tickler. No the tickler isn’t some exotic sex toy, the tickler is a peculiar feature of the Amal Mark 1 carburetor, fitted on all Triumph motorcycles of the 1960s. After turning on the gas tank you had to press a little button on the side of the carburetor a couple of times, to prime the pump, so when you kicked the starter the petrol would already be in the carburetor and wouldn’t have to be sucked in from the tank, which would take a couple of extra kicks.

Of course you had to be careful not to tickle the tickler too much, because that would flood the engine, which then wouldn’t start for at least five minutes no matter how many times you kicked it. So assuming you’ve tickled the tickler just enough, now comes the actual kick, the one that (purportedly) starts the engine. In fact you could say that firing up a Triumph is a thoroughly satisfying experience.

That's why they introduced electric starter motors to later motorcycles, for those with no mechanical ability/Zen.... smile

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#5 Aug 25, 2018 7:06 pm

houston
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Re: Zen and the art of starting a Triumph motorcycle

Yup, breaking a leg with the kick back is painful.
Stalling out at a busy intersection without electronic start is even more painful.

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