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#11 Feb 24, 2017 6:10 pm

Real Distwalker
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

I am sure it is in your genes.  I am 6'4" and 205 lbs.  That is the most I have weighed in my life but am within the normal range at 53 years old.

When I was in school I was teased about my size 12 shoes; they called them canoes.  My son is 6'5" and wears size 16.  My daughter is six feet tall and, unlike her mother, is busty.  She is thin, however.   In 1940 these two would have been in the circus. 

I had all the food I wanted growing up.  My mom probably had enough but there was no snacking and damned little in the way of sweets.  My grandparents struggled to get a full, varied diet and often went hungry during the Great Depression.

I think we have hit Generation Super-Size in the US and I expect other nations will soon catch up.

Now, having said that, it is just a generalization.  There are still thin people.  There are still small people.  But there are a lot more giants today.  Size 16 shoes 50 years ago?  Unheard of!  I think it leads to obesity too.

I am not denying there are differences in genetics.  American Indians have "thrifty genes".  They evolved in an environment where a little bit of food had to go a long ways.  If not, they starved and didn't survive long enough to breed.  Only those who had thrifty genes survived long enough to pass their genes on.

Then along comes the white man with Big Macs. Coca Cola and Krispy Kremes and now obesity is a HUGE problem for Native Americans.   Should there ever come a time when food is scarce, relatively thin guys like us will starve and all those fat people will survive easily.  Thrifty genes save you in times of food shortage but kill you when food is abundant.

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#12 Feb 24, 2017 9:43 pm

New Historian
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

Well sair sir!

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#13 Feb 24, 2017 9:53 pm

Expat
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

Real Distwalker wrote:

I am sure it is in your genes.  I am 6'4" and 205 lbs.  That is the most I have weighed in my life but am within the normal range at 53 years old.

When I was in school I was teased about my size 12 shoes; they called them canoes.  My son is 6'5" and wears size 16.  My daughter is six feet tall and, unlike her mother, is busty.  She is thin, however.   In 1940 these two would have been in the circus. 

I had all the food I wanted growing up.  My mom probably had enough but there was no snacking and damned little in the way of sweets.  My grandparents struggled to get a full, varied diet and often went hungry during the Great Depression.

I think we have hit Generation Super-Size in the US and I expect other nations will soon catch up.

Now, having said that, it is just a generalization.  There are still thin people.  There are still small people.  But there are a lot more giants today.  Size 16 shoes 50 years ago?  Unheard of!  I think it leads to obesity too.

I am not denying there are differences in genetics.  American Indians have "thrifty genes".  They evolved in an environment where a little bit of food had to go a long ways.  If not, they starved and didn't survive long enough to breed.  Only those who had thrifty genes survived long enough to pass their genes on.

Then along comes the white man with Big Macs. Coca Cola and Krispy Kremes and now obesity is a HUGE problem for Native Americans.   Should there ever come a time when food is scarce, relatively thin guys like us will starve and all those fat people will survive easily.  Thrifty genes save you in times of food shortage but kill you when food is abundant.


Sorry I aint going with genes.

Greed or habituation, but not genes.

Fatness tends to run in families.... why?  Because of genes, or more likely because they are all used to sitting around the same table and sharing similar sized portions, and Mommy pumping the baby up like a tyre because she is afraid it will waste away. It is conditioning, plus too many dodgy ingredients in the food.

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#14 Feb 24, 2017 10:12 pm

houston
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

Good healthy home cooking is an era gone by. Quick and convenient food is the diet today.
Busy people have no time in a day to cook a proper meal so off the shelf or drive through junk fills the stomach far to often.
The fat, sugar and salt is killing people.
Check the sodium content on an easy to heat up meal from the grocery store.

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#15 Feb 25, 2017 8:35 am

Slice
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

Expat wrote:
Real Distwalker wrote:

I see a hell of a lot more fat people in the US than in Europe.  That said, not everybody in Europe isn't rail thin anymore.  Starting to see some curves over there.

With livestock, real growth doesn't occur until the third generation of plenty. 

Because the US wasn't devastated in WWII, I think we are one generation ahead of Europe on the fat curve.  I am guessing in about 20 years they are going to see the same obesity epidemic.

The bottom line:  When food is endlessly abundant for three consecutive generations of human beings, obesity reigns.


I will bow to your livestock knowledge, although I would have thought a starved cow would be thin, and a well fed cow.... be fat?

As for humans, yes WW11 would have made a significant difference, as THAT generation learned to cope on very small diets, and learned to be frugal. This mindset would not have gone away simply once the hardships decreased. Many of their children like myself will have lived under their influence.

We have had part of this debate before, and I am pretty sure you defended the corn syrup food deviation up to the hilt, so we are likely to stalemate yet again.

But IMHO post war there has been an upsurge in wealth in the key European Countries, and as a result food has flowed more easily true. But depending on particular cultures it is not only food, but binge drinking etc which has ramped up the waistbands.  Added to that many of the processed foods do have corn syrup which is sweeter than regular sugar to make people addicted to foods that are a long way from healthy.

It is well known.... I think.... that poorer families are almost compelled to eat cheaper foods which are often fattening in nature.

I have had access to as much food as I could want for most of my life. I am far from overweight. Maybe it is my genes, or simply as I have observed many many times when I eat I am content with much less on my plate that fatter people who are eating at the same time as I am.

As a very physically hard working young man I did ramp up my food intake, but on realizing all that was happening was I was spending more money, and visiting the toilet more often. Most likely had I continued into later life I would have become a lard arse. But My eyes are not larger than my belly, so my belly stays respectfully small. During that time of greed, I did see my ability eat more and more increase, and I do like food.... but when reality kicked in, and I stopped shovelling it in I felt hungry for a few days as I ratcheted back down my intake, but after that I stayed on a plateau.

I think the main reason for fat people is self control... or lack of it. Ask just about any person not taking prescribed drugs which could be adversely affecting them.... and they will say.... Oh no, I do not eat very much.... yet I still put on weight...... Then watch what they eat.... both in composition, and volume, and if you are slim by nature, you will recognise they are eating more than necessary.

"It is well known.... I think.... that poorer families are almost compelled to eat cheaper foods which are often fattening in nature."

No they are not.  They are just Sallupp, and not very well educated about what they eat.  In all supermarkets the price is the same for everyone.  Fruits and veggies are really cheap.  Most Poor folks bypass the Vegetable isle and head straight to the Junk food isle.

Being poor is not an excuse for being greedy and your choice of what you put in you belly.  Ah bunch ah folks live to eat and it should be the other way around.

I attend some meeting where food is provided, and most times, I just have to shake me head the way most folks eat.  There is Bajan who is in charge of communication at the place I work, and me and him, does just smile at each other, when we look at the way some folks eat all that free food.  Sometimes we does wonder, if they cook at home.

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#16 Feb 25, 2017 8:41 am

Slice
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

WOW! those are huge feet's for you and you family height and weight. BONJAY, you daughter is real tall.

I still occasionally indulge in ah coke and ah Macdonald Fish sandwich. Never ah Big Mac, but ah hamburger.  Last night ah had an urge to eat some Little Creaser's Pizza.  That made me son happy and we enjoyed our meal.

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#17 Feb 25, 2017 8:48 am

Slice
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

houston wrote:

Good healthy home cooking is an era gone by. Quick and convenient food is the diet today.
Busy people have no time in a day to cook a proper meal so off the shelf or drive through junk fills the stomach far to often.
The fat, sugar and salt is killing people.
Check the sodium content on an easy to heat up meal from the grocery store.

Every time ah to Trinidad ah have to cook every meal.  I think Trinidians are the worst. they totally abundant their kitchen.  They eat every meal outside.  I once ask me Brother-in-law, when was the last time he used his kitchen? his exact words  never. I only use the Microwave to warm up meals.

Sheet in me house we cook three meals a day.  occasionally we do the restaurant thing.

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#18 Feb 25, 2017 10:33 am

Vanni
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

At the human level, we are animals of habit. So the vibes - whether spoken or unspoken, actions, attitudes, mentality, daily life ... - in which we bathed as a child have become our norm as adults.

I am grateful to have been used since young to play in the forest, to be active physically, to eat simple food, to drink water. To have been raised in what I think are rather healthy vibes not just physically, but also in matter of mentality = honesty, loyalty, etc.

None of my parents nor grandparents were overweight, neither on the Italian side, nor on the Swiss side. Of my four brothers, one of the triplets is overweight - so his identical twin and his non-identical twin are both lean. We all tend to look younger than our age. The only brother who is overweight takes anti-depressants, and it seems to be playing a role. But not exclusively. It is also part of his individuality to love rich food and a lot of it. And he is not as physically active as much as my other brothers and myself.

I noticed on other sides of my family that overweight went down from parents to children: can this really be all a question of genes, or is habit the major part of it? Whenever I was eating with them, they had other eating habits than we had. They also were less physically active.

I would not be able to analyse all aspects of overweight, but I am convinced that habits are being taken from baby age on, become norm, and are determining in matter of health and weight.

Now, may we understand that our childhood does not either condemn nor absolutely bless us: it is us who make the difference, in either changing our habits, or keeping the good ones up. If we are letting ourselves go, no blessing whatsoever would save us.

I may sometimes crave for more sweets or others than what I consider as being OK, and I make the conscious choice eat an apple instead - something which really nurtures my body, not just satisfies my senses alone.

I may not be feeling like each day to have a brisk walk to next village, through the forest and back. but I have made it a habit, and whenever I don't feel like, I notice that some part of me yearns for this walk. So I still go, even in a snowstorm, for example, or even if I am feeling tired. It becomes a meditation, a ceremony, a celebration, a moment of grace, a spiritual and physical experience. And this, we can extend to each everyday gesture, and make it consciously. It is being called mindfulness in buddhism, and I am very much into it: the simplest things become sacred. As well as the most humble food becomes delicious.

In conclusion, I understand by my own experience, that, while we have a human aspect where habits are leaving their positive or negative mark on us, where habits may make us feel either different or similar to the others - fitting or not fitting into a society, a culture - they do not condemn us: we have all in common the same spiritual Source which allows us to find healing and union with each other. We may develop being in touch with this spiritual Source within, and find guidance there.

A guidance leading us to good health, a guidance leading us toward each other.

Last edited by Vanni (Feb 25, 2017 12:22 pm)

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#19 Feb 25, 2017 11:05 am

Calypso
Member

Re: By 2030, Americans will have the lowest life expectancy

Real Distwalker wrote:

Again, America is a large country with a diverse population.   Saying "Americans die young" is absurd.  Asian Americans have a life expectancy that is as long as, well, Asians.  African Americans in Chicago have a much shorter life expectancy because life expectancy is an average.  If a bunch die in their teens and twenties, life expectancy drops a lot.

Life expectancy among Caucasians of the Northern Plains is right in there with life expectancy in Europe.   Life expecancy among blacks in Mississippi is pretty low but it comparable to Grenada.

Life expectancy among Native Americas is lowest of all which seems proportional to their use of alcohol and narcotics.

I am 53 years old and have a living grandmother.  My 75 year old father can call his mother on the phone.  She still lives independently and drives a car.  I had two great grandparents who lived to more than 100.  Being American didn't kill them young.

I have been arguing against this tendency to generalize about huge populations of people.  How do you generalize about a population of over 300 million?  Lots of Americans live to be 110.  Lots of Americans die young.  There is a huge and radical standard deviation.

In other words, the average life expectancy in the US doesn't have anything to do with how long any individual American might live.

Life expectancy among African Americans is short because they are not a educated and wealthy as white Americans. They do not have access to healthcare or don't try to. Their diet is rather different as well for it is usually higher in salt and fat. They also do not get a lot of exercise. I swim 3 days a week and I'll do not see any blacks where I go. I see older white an Asian women. Some of them can't even walk well but they love to exercise. I am 53 years old as well  and is very conscious  as to what goes in my body. My mother died at 73. She did not take care of herself. My father is 75 as well and is in far better health. He is also very active like me and  gets his exercise everyday. Diabetes is now on the rampage in the Caribbean. People have access to fish and greens but do not eat them. They like eating all that starch without realizing that it isn't healthy for them.

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