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#1 May 15, 2019 8:56 pm

Expat
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The demise of the honey bee

Taken from an email to me... At least one nay sayer who lives in the middle of Monsanto land will say it is bllocks, but then he seems to be in denial about everything that costs money.

:-

Honeybees are a vital part of our environment…

Did you know that they are responsible for pollinating 70% of the crops we depend on for food?

These busy little insects are crucial when it comes to feeding the world, and if they were to disappear, we would quickly be faced with a crisis.

But there are plenty of bees, right?

Sadly, that’s not the case.

For years, the honeybee population has been declining. A mysterious phenomenon called “colony collapse” is to blame, taking out entire hives when worker bees die off and leave the queen and young to slowly starve.

The problem was first noticed in 1997, but it wasn’t until 2005 that the die-off rose to a level that attracted international attention.

Since then, scientists have been scrambling to find the cause of the problem…while bees continue to disappear at an alarming rate.

Beekeepers have seen up to a 70% reduction in their bee populations, with no way to stop the loss. Finally, a breakthrough was made last year.

What’s to blame for the dangerous decline in our bees?

Glyphosate…from Roundup.

Once again, Roundup is responsible for a preventable environmental disaster that is threatening both an entire species and our food chain. What is it about Roundup that is hurting the bees?

The answer is important, because it affects humans as well.

Glyphosate is not just an herbicide; it is also patented as an antibiotic1.

When bees come in contact with plants that have been sprayed by glyphosate, the chemical acts as an antibiotic and kills off important bacteria in the bee’s digestive tract…

Leaving it vulnerable to illness.

Humans also have a complex gut biome that is vital to our health and wellbeing, and glyphosate damages the balance in our digestive tracts as well. We are just beginning to understand the importance of our microbiome and the way it affects our health, mood, and even weight.

The decline of honeybees is a warning that the 3.5 billion tons of glyphosate that have been sprayed indiscriminately on plants since 19742 are having a profound effect on our health as well as on the environment….

And we need to take this problem very seriously.

Unless we stop saturating our lawns, fields, and food with toxic glyphosate, honeybees will continue to die, and we will begin to see a decline in the foods, flowers, and plants that rely on bees for pollination.

In the meantime, the plight of the honeybees has reached the media and we’re hearing about the important role they play in our environment.

More people have started keeping bees, and information about how to protect them is being shared.

Let’s hope, for the bees’ sake and for ours, that the link between glyphosate and colony collapse does not get buried by Monsanto/Bayer, and that action is taken to remove Roundup from the market.

Until then, it can’t hurt to plant some bee-friendly flowers in your yard…

And keep them pesticide free!

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#2 May 16, 2019 10:29 am

Real Distwalker
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Re: The demise of the honey bee

There were no honey bees in the Western Hemisphere prior to European's introducing them.  They are literally an invasive species.

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#3 May 16, 2019 9:54 pm

Expat
Active

Re: The demise of the honey bee

Real Distwalker wrote:

There were no honey bees in the Western Hemisphere prior to European's introducing them.  They are literally an invasive species.


You made a similarly asinine comment previously. Does it matter a a cows fart if a BENEFICIAL species was naturally there, or introduced. Presumably the native bees were not up to it, so were relegated to second tier.

Presumably as these second rate bees have not been vital to crop production they have not been monitored so closely for hive collapse.

I do remember watching a program donkeys years ago how apiarists travelled up and down America fertilising the various crops. My guess is no one was giving a rats arse that they were an introduced species as they were doing the job.

The key point, be it native or introduced your favourite antibiotic is damaging their gut flora, just as it is damaging humans, and the end result for the bees at least is they are dying out. Humans are besieged by the same toxins, as well as many more.... mostly man made, and are set to follow them, although not in such a simple way.

Chronic illnesses are expanding by the decade. One hopes the penny will drop eventually that most of it is self created.

While they are spending millions on finding cures for Cancer, and to be fair a cure aint a bad thing, even if the current treatments are pretty barbaric, if they spent a few hundreds of thousands on understanding what keeps the human body healthy, and able to fight off many of these illnesses it would reduce the need for the pharmaceutical to make billions out of hapless patients.

Most of the information is out there already in papers from prestigious universities and recognised medical journals, but it simply is not taken up by mainstream as it would radically change the dynamics of health care and would put a lot of people out of cushy jobs.

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#4 May 16, 2019 10:52 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: The demise of the honey bee

The Western Hemisphere managed to live, thrive and survive for eons without European honey bees.

Last edited by Real Distwalker (May 17, 2019 8:51 am)

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#5 May 17, 2019 1:29 pm

Expat
Active

Re: The demise of the honey bee

Real Distwalker wrote:

The Western Hemisphere managed to live, thrive and survive for eons without European honey bees.

Yes, but now you are asking a thousand times more agricultural output than you did for eons. Your fruit trees your berry plants MOST crops of some kind or another have been enhanced by the introduction of the honey bee.... if it hadn't been deemed beneficial and if it hadn't been used for decades with nobody saying   eww these migrants need to be kept in camps at the border because they might damage our eco system, then surely some smart arse would have had them rounded up by ICE and shipped back.

I am getting worried about you dude recently you seem to have simply gone into none thinking perverse mode. Maybe you have been using too much aluminium cookware or had one too many flue shots. Mercury is a toxin you know.

Oh for your enlightenment the honey bee was first introduced into America in 1622.... it may have taken 231 years to reach the West coat, but it has been with you for a bloody long time. You could almost say eons......

https://www.losangelescountybeekeepers. … s-in-ameri

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#6 May 17, 2019 4:31 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: The demise of the honey bee

There are damned few crops on this side of the globe that can only be pollinated by the European honey bee.  The vast majority that are pollinated by European bees can also be pollinated by native insects.

Frankly, hive collapse in Europe which is the native range of the bees is far more concerning that hive collapse in the Western Hemisphere where they didn't evolve.

That said, my hope is that the bees can be saved but I am not going to lay awake over it.


Expat wrote:

I am getting worried about you dude recently you seem to have simply gone into none thinking perverse mode. Maybe you have been using too much aluminium cookware or had one too many flue shots. Mercury is a toxin you know.

I know, rather than drinking the wine, enjoying life and letting the world be the world as I am doing, I am supposed to read about global warming that I can't change, hive collapse that has unknown causes and near-earth asteroids that nobody can do anything about and then trumpet my worries on the Internet.  You know, like you.

Nope.  I am not going to do that.  I used to do that, but no more.   I can't change the world but I have learned to live with it.  I only have one short life.  I will be damned if I am going to spend any more of it pissed off, stressed out or tilting against windmills.

If you think my desire to enjoy my life and devote my energy to ways I can make a difference locally is perverse thinking.  If you think I should worry with you about shit over which I have zero control, well, it is you who is engaging in perverse thinking.

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#7 May 17, 2019 6:26 pm

Expat
Active

Re: The demise of the honey bee

Real Distwalker wrote:

There are damned few crops on this side of the globe that can only be pollinated by the European honey bee.  The vast majority that are pollinated by European bees can also be pollinated by native insects.

Frankly, hive collapse in Europe which is the native range of the bees is far more concerning that hive collapse in the Western Hemisphere where they didn't evolve.

That said, my hope is that the bees can be saved but I am not going to lay awake over it.


Expat wrote:

I am getting worried about you dude recently you seem to have simply gone into none thinking perverse mode. Maybe you have been using too much aluminium cookware or had one too many flue shots. Mercury is a toxin you know.

I know, rather than drinking the wine, enjoying life and letting the world be the world as I am doing, I am supposed to read about global warming that I can't change, hive collapse that has unknown causes and near-earth asteroids that nobody can do anything about and then trumpet my worries on the Internet.  You know, like you.

Nope.  I am not going to do that.  I used to do that, but no more.   I can't change the world but I have learned to live with it.  I only have one short life.  I will be damned if I am going to spend any more of it pissed off, stressed out or tilting against windmills.

If you think my desire to enjoy my life and devote my energy to ways I can make a difference locally is perverse thinking.  If you think I should worry with you about shit over which I have zero control, well, it is you who is engaging in perverse thinking.

If you can't be bothered don't engage.

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#8 May 17, 2019 6:54 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: The demise of the honey bee

I can't be bothered to tilt against windmills.

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#9 May 17, 2019 8:23 pm

houston
Active

Re: The demise of the honey bee

The little stingers can hurt. I don’t miss them hovering over a stack of pancakes with a good portion of butter and maple syrup during an outdoor breakfast.


https://youtu.be/bffIFSNhOg8

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