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#1 Jul 01, 2019 6:09 pm

houston
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BBC

A story that Expat might be interested in.
I know this lady quite well, she is a very good friend of my eldest sister. Played baseball with her husband Danny (a Japanese fellow) on the same team for several years. Beer league baseball of course.
I was aware that Blanka had been injured by a car bomb in Belfast during the height of trouble in the early seventies. I knew that she was a student at the time, other than that, she did not talk openly about that day and I certainly wouldn't ask, but often wondered how a Checkosolvakian girl could be caught in the midst of that mess.
Recently my sister, along with a large group of friends and their spouses visited Ireland. They toured the north and the south. During a stay in Portstewart, auntie B put Blanka in touch with a BBC reporter who then posted the following story. I'm amazed that the BBC was able to dig up a photo of Blanka from that day. Also amazed at how much compassion the young British soldier took in caring for her.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-northern … lfast-bomb

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#2 Jul 01, 2019 9:12 pm

Expat
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Re: BBC

houston wrote:

A story that Expat might be interested in.
I know this lady quite well, she is a very good friend of my eldest sister. Played baseball with her husband Danny (a Japanese fellow) on the same team for several years. Beer league baseball of course.
I was aware that Blanka had been injured by a car bomb in Belfast during the height of trouble in the early seventies. I knew that she was a student at the time, other than that, she did not talk openly about that day and I certainly wouldn't ask, but often wondered how a Checkosolvakian girl could be caught in the midst of that mess.
Recently my sister, along with a large group of friends and their spouses visited Ireland. They toured the north and the south. During a stay in Portstewart, auntie B put Blanka in touch with a BBC reporter who then posted the following story. I'm amazed that the BBC was able to dig up a photo of Blanka from that day. Also amazed at how much compassion the young British soldier took in caring for her.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-northern … lfast-bomb

Lets hope he made it through his tours of Northern Ireland.

As a Para he would definitely be a hard bastard in conflict(eg. The Falklands), but it doesn't stop them from still being human.

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#3 Jul 01, 2019 9:23 pm

New Historian
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Re: BBC

Expat what did you think of the Falklands war? I was living in England then and watched it unfold in utter disbelief. And do you agree that Thatcher's personal order to sink the Belgrano, the first shot of the war, when it was steaming away from the exclusion zone, was a war crime? But the Brit armed forces did an amazing job, 8,000 miles from home in inhospitable conditions, the war eventually came down to personal bravery of men fighting hand to hand. Amazing.

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#4 Jul 01, 2019 9:47 pm

Expat
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Re: BBC

New Historian wrote:

Expat what did you think of the Falklands war? I was living in England then and watched it unfold in utter disbelief. And do you agree that Thatcher's personal order to sink the Belgrano, the first shot of the war, when it was steaming away from the exclusion zone, was a war crime? But the Brit armed forces did an amazing job, 8,000 miles from home in inhospitable conditions, the war eventually came down to personal bravery of men fighting hand to hand. Amazing.

So what if the Belgrano turned around? I don't think in that situation you can use the rules of engagement of civilian life where if you turn away you are no longer perceived a threat. Also it could have brought the Argies to their senses and cut the war short.

Did all the established Argentinian forces go off to a beach to be collected? Nope. It reduced the potential of reinforcements. I know it was an earlier conflict, and I know they got tried for other war crimes, but did the Germans get tried for Torpedoing millions of tons of Merchant shipping, and troop ships with hundreds a time on board Hundreds of miles out to sea?

I think that whole event was a skin of the teeth job, we were at the absolute limit of logistical supply. We were bloody lucky that our forces were vastly more experienced, older and trained than the Argies. This takes nothing from the Paras that did amazing things. Yomping 50 miles before turning the established troops into mincemeat.

It certainly gave the French missile industry a boost with the carnage they managed with the exocet.

Last edited by Expat (Jul 01, 2019 9:47 pm)

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#5 Jul 01, 2019 11:08 pm

New Historian
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Re: BBC

At the time I remember musing: "Hmm, what would the Iron Bitch be doing if all the Falkland islanders were black? Or Indian? Or ...?

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#6 Jul 02, 2019 7:37 pm

Expat
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Re: BBC

New Historian wrote:

At the time I remember musing: "Hmm, what would the Iron Bitch be doing if all the Falkland islanders were black? Or Indian? Or ...?


The same thing, as it had frig all to do with the Island and it's people, more to do with the geological rights to the areas around Antarctica.

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