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#1 Nov 11, 2019 12:02 pm

Dancer
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REMEMBRANCE DAY Armistice Day ... 11. 11

On REMEMBRANCE DAY

I remember my Dad  in his uniform, with his fellow 20 years old   islander  fellow soldiers   ,   in photos that we  still  have   ,   while he was stationed in Egypt. 1944. In his uniform and overcoat .

My brother took them to be renewed .  I've got my copies somewhere.

Anyhow buy a poppy. Somebody.

Last edited by Dancer (Nov 11, 2019 12:07 pm)

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#2 Nov 11, 2019 12:06 pm

New Historian
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Re: REMEMBRANCE DAY Armistice Day ... 11. 11

In what arm of the armed forces did he serve? I'm really interested in researching the contributions made by West Indians to the war effort - to sing the unsung heroes.

Volunteers.png

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#3 Nov 11, 2019 12:11 pm

Dancer
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Re: REMEMBRANCE DAY Armistice Day ... 11. 11

Now that is a good question .  My brother is the family historian . I will  try to answer that question ..

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#4 Nov 11, 2019 8:12 pm

Expat
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Re: REMEMBRANCE DAY Armistice Day ... 11. 11

New Historian wrote:

In what arm of the armed forces did he serve? I'm really interested in researching the contributions made by West Indians to the war effort - to sing the unsung heroes.

https://i.postimg.cc/XG3rG6r2/Volunteers.png

It has taken a damn long time, but too slowly there is being recognitian of both West Indian and African support during the Wars.

On the BBC on Sunday they took two Jamaican descendants on one side to discuss their reason for attending, and they highlighted some of the African and West Indian contributions, where they were in the front line and took heavy casualties but were airbrushed out of history.

Right or wrong....ok it was wrong, but I can understand with history, and mind sets of the WW1 period where officers were part of the ruling classes and very up themselves, there could be what we would now call racist thinking, but it should have been less present during WW2.

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#5 Nov 11, 2019 9:37 pm

New Historian
Active

Re: REMEMBRANCE DAY Armistice Day ... 11. 11

Expat wrote:
New Historian wrote:

In what arm of the armed forces did he serve? I'm really interested in researching the contributions made by West Indians to the war effort - to sing the unsung heroes.

https://i.postimg.cc/XG3rG6r2/Volunteers.png

It has taken a damn long time, but too slowly there is being recognitian of both West Indian and African support during the Wars.

On the BBC on Sunday they took two Jamaican descendants on one side to discuss their reason for attending, and they highlighted some of the African and West Indian contributions, where they were in the front line and took heavy casualties but were airbrushed out of history.

Right or wrong....ok it was wrong, but I can understand with history, and mind sets of the WW1 period where officers were part of the ruling classes and very up themselves, there could be what we would now call racist thinking, but it should have been less present during WW2.


People in the colonies only had to look back to the Great War, to see what happened to those Black colonials foolish enough to enter the white man’s war. Many West Indians volunteered to fight for Britain in her time of need, but when they got to France, the men of the British West Indies Regiment found themselves restricted to the most menial of support duties: digging latrines, transporting corpses, clearing mines. In the British Army they faced the same injustice and racial discrimination they’d received back home. All the officers were white, and the white planters of Trinidad even formed their own exclusive volunteer force: the Merchants and Planters Contingent.

These loyal Black West Indian soldiers were unceremoniously tossed back to their homelands when Britain no longer needed them: unsung, unpaid, unknown. The returning soldiers felt, quite rightly, that they’d been dealt a raw deal from their so-called Motherland. Therefore when 1939 came around, some people with long enough memories looked askance at all this new-found patriotic hoopla: now that England in trouble she say want help from allyou - you think they give a shit about you otherwise?

Despite these few contrary views, the vast majority of West Indians, of all classes and colours, were fervently behind Britain in her time of need. Grenadians bought so many War Bonds they financed a brand-new Spitfire fighter that was in use in Europe. Many men (and women) went to England and contributed in one of several ways: joining the Armed Forces principally the RAF, or working in England in the armaments industry, like my father. Many made the Supreme Sacrifice.

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