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#1 Nov 23, 2019 10:20 am

New Historian
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Comparison of electricity tariffs

Every 2 years I ask members of my far-flung family to send me their electricity bills, for a comparison of tariffs. At 33 US cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh) Jamaica tops the list, for the second year running, followed closely by Grenada at 32 cents. But wait a minute, Jamaica is 10 times the size of Grenada, shouldn’t economies of scale dictate that Jamaica’s tariff be lower than little Grenada? True, but Jamaica has an electricity loss ratio of 25%, which means that one quarter of the electricity produced by JPS is, shall we say, “unaccounted for”. Or, as my daughter would say: “Dem too damn tief!” Jamaica’s tariff rose 3.8% between 2017 and 2019, and Grenada’s 13.6%.

What really surprised me this year was the cost of electricity in New York City – through the roof! Residents of Queens, New York City, pay a whopping 28 cents per kWh, double the national average of 13.9 cents. This is even higher than the average rate in NYC: “The 20.2 cents per kWh New York households paid for electricity in August 2019 was 45% more than the national average”. New York, you’re getting ripped off.

Only slightly less surprising was London, where they pay 25 cents per kWh – just one cent less than Barbados, at 26 cents! For a country the size of the UK, with a fully private and competitive electricity sector, this high tariff is, quite simply, preposterous. Not only is it high, between 2017 and 2019 the tariff increased by a whopping 43%! London, you too are getting ripped off.

At the lower end of the scale, Toronto pays a reasonable 15 cents and Florida a miserly 11 cents per kWh, lower than the national average. The average tariff in South Africa is only 9 cents per kWh. Thanks to Old King Coal.

And finally, I looked at a bill from Trinidad. The retail tariff there is, wait for it, 6 cents per kWh! While the nation’s once-abundant oil and gas reserves are fast dwindling, Trinidadians continue to enjoy subsidized energy prices – and consequently consume electricity like it’s going out of style. The same applies to water: Trinidadians are the most subsidized, mollycoddled consumers in the world. For now.

Thanks for the data, everyone!


Retail-tariffs-2019.jpg

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#2 Nov 24, 2019 11:24 am

Dancer
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

I will start looking at electric bills differently , from now on.
lol.

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#3 Nov 24, 2019 1:28 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

One of the reasons I put a geothermal, ground source heat pump in my house is that, from November 1 until May 15, I pay half price for electricity for that system.  It is separately metered.  Right now that is about $0.05 per kwh. 

Propane is about $1.35 per gallon right now.  It would have to be $0.15 per gallon to heat my home for the same cost as my geothermal system.

Oh, and I get most of my power from wind so it is good for the environment too.

For the record, my house is now 100% LED lighting now too.

Last edited by Real Distwalker (Nov 24, 2019 1:29 pm)

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#4 Nov 24, 2019 5:11 pm

Expat
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

Real Distwalker wrote:

One of the reasons I put a geothermal, ground source heat pump in my house is that, from November 1 until May 15, I pay half price for electricity for that system.  It is separately metered.  Right now that is about $0.05 per kwh. 

Propane is about $1.35 per gallon right now.  It would have to be $0.15 per gallon to heat my home for the same cost as my geothermal system.

Oh, and I get most of my power from wind so it is good for the environment too.

For the record, my house is now 100% LED lighting now too.


Hope you haven't got warm white bulbs I hate them, cold white for me.

Lets see how their longevity goes, some of the ones I have had didn't get anywhere the 10,000,000,000,000,000 hours they claim.

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#5 Nov 24, 2019 6:13 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

You pays your monies, you takes your choice.


kevin-temperature-lights-explication.jpg

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#6 Nov 25, 2019 11:05 am

Expat
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

Is true.....and yet.

To get white or cold white is very hard.

Certainly here, although by some quirk IGA seem to have some, but also in the UK, most retail outlets seem to be warm white... I loath it. A local retailer told me its only really Europeans that want the white light, maybe according to him that they are used to the diffused white light of the northern regions.

The light isn't as bright, and the older you get the more you need a clear light to see small print, also I am the child of an artist, and I learned the benefits of "North Light" ie. a room that is North facing with respect to colour cast.

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#7 Nov 25, 2019 1:15 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

I have the white lights in my home workshop and in my garage.  Otherwise, I like the warmer colored light too.

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#8 Nov 25, 2019 7:31 pm

Expat
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

Oh well, I was going to crash yer pad, and party over Christmas, but unless you can put a cot in the garage with the white bulbs I just would need to tap around the mansion with a white stick, so I'll pass. ANOTHER HOT HOT Christmas I guess.... Oh well.

Last edited by Expat (Nov 25, 2019 7:32 pm)

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#9 Nov 25, 2019 8:04 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

I will put white light bulbs in the guest room.  Trust me, you will get plenty of very white light through the window off the snow.

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#10 Nov 26, 2019 3:42 pm

Expat
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Re: Comparison of electricity tariffs

You is a Bud.  smile

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