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#1 Jan 03, 2020 8:54 pm

houston
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Life of a farmer

"We can't eat our way through what we produce, so we're heavily dependant on export markets"

https://business.financialpost.com/comm … rella-crop

Have to say it's difficult to feel sympathy for heavily subsidised farmers no matter what crop they decide to cash in on. (Ginseng maybe, with huge 5 year returns)
Can't say I've ever passed by a farm that looked like it was suffering from poverty. Huge homes with the latest high end vehicles parked in all that space. Three, four or more kids that get picked up by a bus at the driveway and delivered to and from school by bus. No walking over to a collection point with the neighbour kids.
These kids are pampered with country life, then afforded the best university educations money can buy.
What bothers me most is seeing the bumper stickers displayed by these folks in their great big pick-up trucks.
"Farmers feed cities"
Well guess what, cities subsidize farmers.

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#2 Jan 03, 2020 8:58 pm

houston
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Re: Life of a farmer

BTW, I have never met a poor farmer. Crying farmers, yes.

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#3 Jan 03, 2020 9:48 pm

Expat
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Re: Life of a farmer

Maybe only in Canada or America?  Thousands have gone under in the UK.. Suicide was the prime cause of death at one point.

Maybe we see what we want to see, or maybe you haven't walked in their shoes.? Those megga farms didn't get to sprawl all over the plains in one go. Farmers came and went, and technology and for some GMO has made profitability more likely. At potentially a huge cost to us all, but greed is a short sighted thing.

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#4 Jan 03, 2020 10:27 pm

houston
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Re: Life of a farmer

Most farms here have been family run for generations.  The chance of failure is slim, even with a poor crop due to weather. They own so much land, they can pretty much demand which type of farming the government will kick in for.

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#5 Jan 03, 2020 11:05 pm

New Historian
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Re: Life of a farmer

houston wrote:

BTW, I have never met a poor farmer. Crying farmers, yes.

Good one, lot of truth in that! Certainly in Amurka, when I worked with US farmers in the 80s none of them looked hard up, they all drove some big old pickups lol! England also has its gentlemen farmers, making endless money off butter mountains and milk lakes and EU subsidies - oops scratch that one!

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#6 Jan 04, 2020 10:46 am

Slice
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Re: Life of a farmer

One of the very crazy programs in America. One of the reasons we are taxed so damn much.  But they are still suffering in America.  Nothing beats ah Bumper crop, when sold.

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#7 Jan 04, 2020 9:15 pm

Expat
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Re: Life of a farmer

New Historian wrote:
houston wrote:

BTW, I have never met a poor farmer. Crying farmers, yes.

Good one, lot of truth in that! Certainly in Amurka, when I worked with US farmers in the 80s none of them looked hard up, they all drove some big old pickups lol! England also has its gentlemen farmers, making endless money off butter mountains and milk lakes and EU subsidies - oops scratch that one!


I guess that comment    >>Thousands have gone under in the UK.. Suicide was the prime cause of death at one point.<< passed you bye.

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#8 Jan 04, 2020 9:44 pm

New Historian
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Re: Life of a farmer

These are the "farmers" I'm talking about, not the hard working dairy farmers from Somerrset.

https://unearthed.greenpeace.org/2017/0 … -payments/

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#9 Jan 04, 2020 9:50 pm

Real Distwalker
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Re: Life of a farmer

If its any consolation, the farmers in my family still live on the land and drive tractors, planters and harvesters.   They still tend to the hogs.

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