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#21 Sep 23, 2020 9:32 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Beach gone

houston wrote:

Not sure where that sand is if not gone. There are certainly no new beaches being born along the southeastern coast of Lake Huron.
Like I say, I have never seen the beaches disappearing this much, over this short of time during my time.
Coincidentally this quick erosion has been taking place in conjunction with the breaking off of some of the largest sections of the ice shelf in recorded history.

https://www.ontarioparks.com/parksblog/ … es-pinery/

Ahhh, but is that the North Ice Cap, or the Suuthern Ice cap you are refering too as to breaking off.

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#22 Sep 23, 2020 10:20 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

The Arctic cap, but I suspect the southern is not much healthier.
Don't worry though, it's just a natural phenomena that occurs once every 10,000 years.

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5723009

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#23 Sep 23, 2020 10:40 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

Another natural phenomena...corn crops growing on Ellis Island.

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/amp.dw.com/ … a-54493275

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#24 Sep 23, 2020 11:02 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

I am sure that human activities have affected the climate.  That said, this notion that the climate would be stable in the absence of human activities is ridiculous on its face.  The climate has had radically extreme climate changes - far more extreme than we are experiencing now -  thousands of times before humanity existed.

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#25 Sep 24, 2020 4:12 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

houston wrote:

Another natural phenomena...corn crops growing on Ellis Island.

https://www.google.ca/amp/s/amp.dw.com/ … a-54493275

Excuse me, meant to write Ellesmere Island.
Not sure how that became Ellis Island...if it matters.

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#26 Sep 24, 2020 4:27 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

Scientists have found something about the North Pole that could send a shiver down Santa's spine: It used to be downright balmy.

In fact, 55 million years ago the Arctic was once a lot like Miami, with an average temperature of 74 degrees, alligator ancestors and palm trees, scientists say.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/study-nort … -tropical/

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#27 Sep 24, 2020 4:28 pm

houston
Active

Re: Beach gone

Real Distwalker wrote:

I am sure that human activities have affected the climate.  That said, this notion that the climate would be stable in the absence of human activities is ridiculous on its face.  The climate has had radically extreme climate changes - far more extreme than we are experiencing now -  thousands of times before humanity existed.

I agree with much of what you say, but this notion of climate cycles that have gradually taken place over eons in the past, as being normal, I don't agree.
Things are occurring way out of the ordinary, way to fast.

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#28 Sep 24, 2020 4:33 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Beach gone

That the climate has changed radically over the eons is not really open to debate.  Witness: Snowball Earth.  At this point, the entire planet may have been frozen... even the tropics.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowball_Earth

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#29 Sep 25, 2020 6:32 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Beach gone

Real Distwalker wrote:

That the climate has changed radically over the eons is not really open to debate.  Witness: Snowball Earth.  At this point, the entire planet may have been frozen... even the tropics.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowball_Earth


Not to metion the land formations were not the same, 55 Million years ago the Atlantic was way smaller both North and South, the countries of the North were MUCH closer together. The Meditereanian was still to be created as Africa was an Island, South America, and Australia were very close to what is now Antarctica. It was a Different World. The currents and wind patterns that turned Antartica into a frozen waste probably had not really even started yet.

Yes theyse changes happened, but because the land masses and climactic response to them was obviously very different.

We know not that long ago Geologically speaking the Sahara was a green and pleasant land, but changes are happening increasingly rapidly something that they were saying would happen 50/60 years ago, when maybe the tipping point had not been reached.

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