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#11 May 05, 2018 5:00 pm

houston
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Re: Never mind Windrush

Homonyms and synonyms,...talk about confusion?
"I began to tire as I was changing the tire"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"They road began to wind just as the wind picked up"

That is two much to learn for one day!

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#12 May 05, 2018 6:41 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Real Distwalker wrote:

Plough through enough dough to make you cough or hiccough.


Seems you are stuck back in the ancient past dude. Sometimes we can be too clever..

>Modern spelling first recorded 1788; An Old English word for it was ælfsogoða, so called because hiccups were thought to be caused by elves. hiccough 1620s, variant of hiccup (q.v.) by mistaken association with cough. By etymological standards, both have "folk etymologies" although hiccup is the most correct.<

Nothing wrong with the rest of it, and what was your problem, easy peasy. Oh but I forgot, I am not American...  smile

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#13 May 05, 2018 6:51 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

houston wrote:

Homonyms and synonyms,...talk about confusion?
"I began to tire as I was changing the tire"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"They road began to wind just as the wind picked up"

That is two much to learn for one day!


>>"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"The road began to wind just as the wind picked up"<<

Or
"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to terminate his employment"
"The road began to meander just as the wind picked up"

Roads don't wind, they may be windy but they don't wind.  smile They may be long and winding, but they don't wind. To say they do would mean they effect the change by themselves and as solid constructs (mostly) they cannot move except due to external forces. With the exception of a cartoon of course.

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#14 May 05, 2018 7:00 pm

Real Distwalker
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Americans would write: Plow through enough dough to make you cough or hiccup.   That's only a little better.

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#15 May 05, 2018 7:16 pm

houston
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Expat wrote:
houston wrote:

Homonyms and synonyms,...talk about confusion?
"I began to tire as I was changing the tire"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"They road began to wind just as the wind picked up"

That is two much to learn for one day!


>>"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"The road began to wind just as the wind picked up"<<

Or
"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to terminate his employment"
"The road began to meander just as the wind picked up"

Roads don't wind, they may be windy but they don't wind.  smile They may be long and winding, but they don't wind. To say they do would mean they effect the change by themselves and as solid constructs (mostly) they cannot move except due to external forces. With the exception of a cartoon of course.

Okay, how about a rope..
Does it get windy or winedy on a windy day?

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#16 May 06, 2018 1:43 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

houston wrote:
Expat wrote:
houston wrote:

Homonyms and synonyms,...talk about confusion?
"I began to tire as I was changing the tire"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"They road began to wind just as the wind picked up"

That is two much to learn for one day!


>>"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"The road began to wind just as the wind picked up"<<

Or
"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to terminate his employment"
"The road began to meander just as the wind picked up"

Roads don't wind, they may be windy but they don't wind.  smile They may be long and winding, but they don't wind. To say they do would mean they effect the change by themselves and as solid constructs (mostly) they cannot move except due to external forces. With the exception of a cartoon of course.

Okay, how about a rope..
Does it get windy or winedy on a windy day?

Tangled... smile English is a big language, there are plenty of options...

It could become unwound on a windy day, or wound up on a windy day or unravelled on a windy day. Or we could stay tightly wound on a calm day.

Last edited by Expat (May 06, 2018 1:49 pm)

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#17 May 06, 2018 2:16 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Real Distwalker wrote:

Americans would write: Plow through enough dough to make you cough or hiccup.   That's only a little better.

I think that's what I inferred the British would say were we to attempt that quote except we know how to spell plough, and even cow, and sow. It was your quote and it was not relevant to anything after the 1788.

Generally speaking there are various ploughs, also there is a switch plow, which probably due to field size is an American variation, which does not make such big furrows, but simply turns soil.

The modern word Plough comes from the Norse plógr so is basically Germanic.

Whatever, basically like with so many things Trumpian, Plow is an isolationist use of a word the rest of the English speaking world calls plough.

Like I said, Webster had to make it easy for the multi tongued new migrants to the land of the American dream.

Fear not the mother tongue is being dumbed down every day in Mother England.  There will be parity across the pond very soon.

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#18 May 06, 2018 5:36 pm

houston
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Expat wrote:
houston wrote:
Expat wrote:

>>"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to fire him"
"The road began to wind just as the wind picked up"<<

Or
"I began to tire as I was changing the tyre"
"As a result of the fire, I had to terminate his employment"
"The road began to meander just as the wind picked up"

Roads don't wind, they may be windy but they don't wind.  smile They may be long and winding, but they don't wind. To say they do would mean they effect the change by themselves and as solid constructs (mostly) they cannot move except due to external forces. With the exception of a cartoon of course.

Okay, how about a rope..
Does it get windy or winedy on a windy day?

Tangled... smile English is a big language, there are plenty of options...

It could become unwound on a windy day, or wound up on a windy day or unravelled on a windy day. Or we could stay tightly wound on a calm day.

Thanks for the schooling...english proper always did make my brain hurt.

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#19 May 06, 2018 5:55 pm

houston
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

Newfoundise is an entirely different language.

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#20 May 10, 2018 11:33 pm

Expat
Active

Re: Never mind Windrush

houston wrote:
Expat wrote:
houston wrote:

Okay, how about a rope..
Does it get windy or winedy on a windy day?

Tangled... smile English is a big language, there are plenty of options...

It could become unwound on a windy day, or wound up on a windy day or unravelled on a windy day. Or we could stay tightly wound on a calm day.

Thanks for the schooling...english proper always did make my brain hurt.

I fink even the Queen struggles wiv it.

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