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#1 Jun 15, 2018 6:44 pm

houston
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Sea fishing

I'm not much of an angler but love to get out on a charter when ever near the sea.
Had plenty to do on the first visit to Grenada but a high priority was to get out on the ocean for some fishing so I booked a half day adventure with a boat out of the yacht club in St. Georges, Say Aye I think the name of the boat was. Spoke with the captian upon booking, a very pleasant English fellow and he explained that there would be two others joining. Excellent, it cut down on the price, which was very reasonable.
Met at the dock in the a.m and we all got introduced. The pair that joined were a Portuguese newly wed couple from NYC enjoying their honeymoon. They were lovely people.
We set out and the captain asked if we would like to stay within shallower waters and have a better chance of catching lots of small fish or head out beyond the shelf and have a slim chance of catching a big fish. I preferred to catch lots of fish but the couple voted for the chance of a monster in the deep waters. I had no problem with that, so off we went.
The captain and crew were very good at baiting the rods and explaining how to keep a close eye for a catch and grab the rod emmidiatly for best results. The newlyweds never paid much attention to the instructions as they lounged on the upper deck. Hooked onto two sailfish on the way out but they were able to wiggle off. Being able to see those fish dance above water with their sail open was the highlight for me.
After hours of nothing it was time to head back to port. The caribs were flowing when suddenly there was a big fish on the line so I quickly grabbed hold. Say aye, it was a Blue Marlin. The beauty of that fish putting on a show was a sight to behold. The captain got very serious and I sat into the chair trying to hold onto this magnificent creature. Let the fish run then real it back he hollered. This back and forth tuckered me out under the hot sun so the Portuguese guy got into the chair and took over. Slowly the fish was losing distance. Captain would gently reverse the boat to create slack in the line and then wind, wind, wind. After a few shifts in and out the chair the fish was at the side of the boat. She was beautiful, eyes the size of a tennis ball. I wondered what those eyes had seen over the years in the deep depths. We were all smiles, took some photos then released her back into the blue to fight another day.
Captain flew a flag signalling a Marlin catch on our way back to the yacht club. On the dock the newlyweds were presented with a certificate for the catch. I took a photo of them with the captain standing aside Say Aye as they held up the certicate. Fantastic day and I was happy to have photos of that incredible creature from the sea.

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#2 Jun 15, 2018 8:42 pm

Expat
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Re: Sea fishing

houston wrote:

I'm not much of an angler but love to get out on a charter when ever near the sea.
Had plenty to do on the first visit to Grenada but a high priority was to get out on the ocean for some fishing so I booked a half day adventure with a boat out of the yacht club in St. Georges, Say Aye I think the name of the boat was. Spoke with the captian upon booking, a very pleasant English fellow and he explained that there would be two others joining. Excellent, it cut down on the price, which was very reasonable.
Met at the dock in the a.m and we all got introduced. The pair that joined were a Portuguese newly wed couple from NYC enjoying their honeymoon. They were lovely people.
We set out and the captain asked if we would like to stay within shallower waters and have a better chance of catching lots of small fish or head out beyond the shelf and have a slim chance of catching a big fish. I preferred to catch lots of fish but the couple voted for the chance of a monster in the deep waters. I had no problem with that, so off we went.
The captain and crew were very good at baiting the rods and explaining how to keep a close eye for a catch and grab the rod emmidiatly for best results. The newlyweds never paid much attention to the instructions as they lounged on the upper deck. Hooked onto two sailfish on the way out but they were able to wiggle off. Being able to see those fish dance above water with their sail open was the highlight for me.
After hours of nothing it was time to head back to port. The caribs were flowing when suddenly there was a big fish on the line so I quickly grabbed hold. Say aye, it was a Blue Marlin. The beauty of that fish putting on a show was a sight to behold. The captain got very serious and I sat into the chair trying to hold onto this magnificent creature. Let the fish run then real it back he hollered. This back and forth tuckered me out under the hot sun so the Portuguese guy got into the chair and took over. Slowly the fish was losing distance. Captain would gently reverse the boat to create slack in the line and then wind, wind, wind. After a few shifts in and out the chair the fish was at the side of the boat. She was beautiful, eyes the size of a tennis ball. I wondered what those eyes had seen over the years in the deep depths. We were all smiles, took some photos then released her back into the blue to fight another day.
Captain flew a flag signalling a Marlin catch on our way back to the yacht club. On the dock the newlyweds were presented with a certificate for the catch. I took a photo of them with the captain standing aside Say Aye as they held up the certicate. Fantastic day and I was happy to have photos of that incredible creature from the sea.


I you hooked it, and did multiple sessions in the chair how come THEY got the certificate?

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#3 Jun 15, 2018 9:05 pm

houston
Active

Re: Sea fishing

Good question. Probably without the help of the hefty Portuguese guy the fish would have won.

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#4 Jun 15, 2018 9:36 pm

New Historian
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Re: Sea fishing

Sounds like a great day all round! It's only in the last 10 years that I've gotten into deep sea fishing - having it as your business tends to do that to you lol. Sometimes you don't even get a nibble, but even that's a good day. All the "boring" hours spent on the rocking and rolling boat, trolling up and down, further and further offshore, searching for that elusive STRIKE! - all becomes worth every hour, every penny spent. And there's usually LOTS of pennies!

Your English captain, was that Badger? Young cocky cockney but knows his fish.

Before Expat accuses me of advanced Alhzeimers' again, I know I posted this story before, but it's relevant to the case in point.

Tale of a Reluctant Fisherman

When I lived in Barbados in 1990 I discovered the joys of sailing, after buying a small yacht. Notice that sequencing? Take it from me, don’t try this at home: learn first; buy later. It was a home-made 26-foot wooden sailboat called Jump-Up, designed by Van Der Stadt of Holland. Built more for racing than cruising, it was long on speed but short on creature comforts like a working toilet or an engine. Despite my best efforts, I didn’t manage to wreck it during its first two years under my shaky captaincy, and by 1992 I’d convinced myself that I was ready to expand my sailing horizons – literally and otherwise.

My brother Gerry and I were off on a boys’ adventure: a six-week sail through the Eastern Caribbean, on my engine-less 26-foot wooden yacht “Jump-Up”. None of us knew much about sailing, and she could barely be described as seaworthy, but we figured we’d learn as we went. We’d sail from Barbados to our home Grenada, then head north stopping off at Carriacou, Union, Tobago Cays, Mustique, Bequia – plus anywhere else that took our fancy, before sailing back to Bim. After months of getting the boat ready (spend-spend-spend), Gerry flew out from London, and within days we sailed off into the wide blue yonder. After an eventful night’s sail down from Barbados, when we got “lost in Carriacou” (don’t ask), we finally headed down to our home port of Grenada.

As we got nearer to Grenada, we came across a few small fishing boats. The fishermen nod, we nod back. They seemed to be catching a lot of fish, so Gerry and I decided to try our hand. Neither of us were fisher folk, in fact we both hated fishing, but before leaving Barbados we’d bought a lure and hand reel, just for the heck of it. The bait was a blue and yellow rubber squid. We played it out, cleated it off and forgot about it. We had more important things to do, like rehydrate. 

About twenty minutes later I looked back, and saw something thrashing about. I slowed down the boat and we got a better look. It looked big. Very big. What the hell was this? Gerry put on his gloves, got his hands around the spool and started to wind the fish in, by hand. It wasn't easy; the fish was fighting all the way. We were impressed by its sheer power; it took all of Gerry's not inconsiderable strength to haul him in, after a long battle. The fish would go into a frenzy, jumping out of the water so that Gerry could barely hold on. Then he’d play possum, gathering his strength - while Gerry did likewise.

I watched the battle enfold, entranced. Both of them began to flag: go Gerry go! Ten hard sweaty minutes later, Gerry wearily hauled the fish up, over the transom of the boat (the back, for you landlubbers). When we got a good look at him, and were amazed. The fish was enormous! But, what kind of fish was it? We had no idea, all we knew was that it was big. Very big. With teeth. Sharp teeth.

But what now? We were so busy fighting the fish we hadn't thought about what to do with it, after we’d caught it. We had no gaff, no net nor any fishing equipment of any kind. And, after 48 hours at sea, we also didn’t have any ice. What if we got him on board? I had visions of this mad beast inside the cockpit of my little boat, thrashing, gnashing and wreaking havoc - and us if we weren’t careful. Then what? We’d have this big, dead smelly fish on our hands, with no ice and no cooler big enough to hold the bugger. We’d bitten off more than we could chew. Why couldn't we have caught a nice little snapper, instead of this monster? 

Our immediate problem was how to kill the thing. Pulling the thrashing fish into the boat was out of the question. Gerry figured he’d haul it out of the water and hold it there until it ‘drowned’. So he leaned over the transom and lifted the frantic fish out of the water. Better him than me, I thought. 

As Gerry lifted the fish halfway over the transom, we could get a good look at him. He was beautiful. About five feet with a sleek, glossy torso covered in silver stripes. He looked at me, his mouth snapping at air, and something inside me broke. How could I kill this beautiful animal, with the heart of a warrior? I grabbed the camera and snapped a picture. Just as I was about to cut the line, the fish made a final lunge against the transom. Thud!  He literally bit the boat, leaving a row of vicious tooth marks. The line snapped and the fish leapt in a graceful arc, then disappeared into the deep. We saluted him: go well, brave friend.

We breathed a sigh of relief. The episode had a morally correct ending. We had a great battle, the fish lived to fight another day, and we got a picture to prove our fisherman’s tale! Later I showed the picture to some fisher folk, who said it was a wahoo, probably about 40-50 pounds. Which was a big fish. I hope he’s still out there, terrorizing fishermen off Grenada's west coast.


Big_fish.jpg

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#5 Jun 16, 2018 3:34 pm

houston
Active

Re: Sea fishing

It was that story that reminded me of the cargo boat trip.
I couldn't remember captains name but found this.
http://yesaye.com/?redirect=false

Had the boat name wrong, "Yes Aye" not "Say Aye", but same captain Clifford still operating. He was fairly new to the business when I went on the venture way back in 1999. Looks like he has done well in the Billfish tournaments over the years.
His site does mention "Badger" Dearman.

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